Skip to content
Downward facing arrows enclosed in a circle, accompanied by the text "learn more"

Doctor of
Athletic Training

Online Degree

Request Information

Doctor of Athletic Training

Online Degree

Request Information

Curriculum Outline

Doctorate in Athletic Training

A.T. Still University’s (ATSU) Doctor of Athletic Training (DAT) program develops clinical and academic leaders who advance the athletic training profession. Doctors of athletic training serve as expert clinicians, educators, and administrators with advanced knowledge and skills for analyzing, developing, and implementing practical solutions to improve the delivery of athletic healthcare and the health outcomes of physically active individuals and their communities.

Most athletic trainers who are best fit for an online athletic training doctoral degree are elite clinical, educational, and industry professionals who gain a powerful educational benefit as students are embedded in a work setting while progressing through the curriculum. Educators are prepared with the advanced graduate training needed to effectively teach their own students to succeed as athletic trainers. This doctorate in athletic training program will enable DAT students to apply lessons immediately, while also bringing their unique needs and challenges into the online coursework.

Athletic Training Doctorate Students and Alumni

The convenience of online learning, combined with the opportunity to apply lessons immediately to the work setting, is how students are advancing their practice while progressing toward ATSU’s doctor of athletic training degree.

Discover the difference in our DAT degree, first-hand from students and alumni.

Kristina Califano
DAT, MS, ATC | DAT Alumni
Greg Janik
DAT, MS, ATC | DAT Alumni
Heather VanOpdorp
MSEd, ATC | DAT Student
Quinton Sawyer
DAT, MA, AT, ATC | DAT Alumni
Brian Vesci
DAT, MA, ATC | DAT Alumni
Brian Vesci
DAT, MA, ATC | DAT Alumni
Load More Videos +

Doctor of Athletic Training Program Design

The success of the doctor of athletic training degree from A.T. Still University’s Arizona School of Health Sciences (ATSU-ASHS) is attributed to the distinctive program design:

  • Curriculum was built at the PhD level of critical thinking.
  • Tailored for real-world clinical applications.
  • Selection of the best within the athletic training industry and forming students into adept thought leaders who will influence the profession’s standing within the healthcare continuum.
  • Faculty are expert scholars and leaders within their profession, intimately familiar with emerging trends in athletic training practice and education.
  • One of the few post-professional degree programs in athletic training to be affiliated with a private medical and health professions university and housed within a school of health.
  • Designed for those seeking a top athletic training graduate program with a specialized terminal degree dedicated to athletic training as opposed to an academic degree (i.e. PhD) in another field with only a concentration in athletic training.
  • Offers a distinctive opportunity for students to customize their doctorate 20 different ways with graduate certificates they can select from based on their areas of interest and preferred specialization.

Alumni of ATSU’s Master of Science in Athletic Training degree program are already 24% of the way toward obtaining their DAT degree. Doctoral students can actually graduate from the 36-month program as much as 12 months earlier with advanced standing. The courses in the ATSU DAT program are precisely what is needed for contemporary athletic training practice and education and address important profession specific topics not usually covered in other PhD programs.

Athletic Training Program Essentials

Overview
Course List
Tuition
Faculty/Staff
ATSU
Curriculum
Certificates
Requirements
Outcomes
Clinical Decision-Making Foundation
Innovation/Winter Institute
Applied Research Foundation
Rehabilitation Track/Certificate Program
Orthopaedics Track/Certificate Program
Leadership and Education Track/Certificate Program
Sports Neurology and Concussion Track/Certificate Program
Cost
Financial Services
Administration
Faculty
Staff
University Catalog
Accreditation

Doctor of Athletic Training Online Curriculum Overview

ATSU’s Doctor of Athletic Training program online curriculum is built at the PhD level of critical thinking and tailored to real-world application. Faculty are industry experts highly familiar with emerging trends in athletic training practice and education.

ATSU-ASHS also offers a CAATE-accredited, post-professional Master of Science program on campus.

ATSU’s doctor of athletic training degree curriculum is meticulously designed to prepare clinical and academic leaders. Students earning a Doctor of Athletic Training are able to apply lessons immediately, while also bringing their unique needs and challenges into the online coursework.

Learn more about how this curriculum from a leading health sciences University makes a unique difference in helping students advance their knowledge and their careers to the forefront of the athletic training profession.

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDIT HOURS: 69

Download Curriculum Outline

*Eligible for advanced standing, Course also included within the certificate (C) or Master’s (M) program of study

Graduate Certificates

Obtain a graduate certificate for enhanced knowledge in your selected area of interest. Upon deciding later to obtain a doctorate degree in athletic training at ATSU, these graduate certificates will provide advanced standing.

Clinical Decision-Making Certificate

Outcome:

Demonstrate advanced clinical decision-making to determine the effectiveness of athletic training practice.

Objectives:

  1. Implement quality improvement strategies to identify and address quality gaps for the purpose of improving patient outcomes, system performance, and professional development.
  2. Demonstrate advanced clinical decision-making in athletic training practice in a manner that integrates clinical experience, patient values, and the best available evidence.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of clinical outcomes assessments and the value of these outcomes to informing patient care and advancing the athletic training profession.
  4. Utilize information and technology to improve the quality of patient care, manage knowledge, mitigate error, and support clinical decision-making in athletic training practice.

Rehabilitation Certificate

Outcome:

Demonstrate advanced practice athletic training knowledge and skills in the specialty area of rehabilitation.

Objectives:

  1. Integrate the basic science of connective tissue healing (anatomy, physiology, morphology, histology, and biomechanics) into the management of musculoskeletal injuries.
  2. Demonstrate advanced practice knowledge and skills in the assessment and diagnosis of movement dysfunction.
  3. Develop advanced practice knowledge and skills in rehabilitation of movement dysfunction through corrective exercise.
  4. Demonstrate advanced practice knowledge of transitioning from rehabilitation to sport performance.

Orthopaedics Certificate

Outcome:

Demonstrate advanced practice athletic training knowledge and skills in the specialty area of orthopaedics.

Objectives:

  1. Demonstrated advanced practice knowledge and skills in the diagnoses of orthopaedic conditions.
  2. Demonstrated advanced practice knowledge and skills in the management of orthopaedic conditions
  3. Demonstrate advanced practice knowledge and skills in the application and interpretation of common imaging and laboratory techniques used in the examination of orthopaedic patients.
  4. Demonstrate advanced practice knowledge of common orthopaedic surgical procedures with special emphasis on subsequent rehabilitation considerations.

Leadership and Education Certificate

Outcome:

Debate and apply contemporary knowledge and skills in athletic training leadership and education.

Objectives:

  1. Examine the role and influence of athletic trainers on health policy and healthcare delivery systems.
  2. Critically examine and apply the characteristics of leadership in athletic training within the context of becoming an advanced practice leader.
  3. Analyze and debate contemporary issues in athletic training education.
  4. Examine and apply best practices in clinical education and mentoring of athletic training students, young professionals, residents and fellows.

Sports Neurology and Concussion Certificate

Outcome:

Demonstrate advanced practice athletic training knowledge and skills in the sub-specialty area of sports neurology and concussion.

Objectives:

  1. Integrate the basic science of neurologic injury and tissue healing into the management of neurologic injuries.
  2. Demonstrate advanced knowledge in the recognition, assessment, management and referral of patients with sport-related neurologic conditions.
  3. Debate current issues related to the recognition, assessment, and management of activity-related traumatic brain injuries.
  4. Analyze current concepts regarding the assessment, management, and referral of patients with comorbid disorders who suffer activity-related traumatic brain injury.

Requirements

The DAT program will admit athletic training professionals with diverse professional and personal experiences who have demonstrated capacity to pursue a rigorous course of graduate study. Prospective students will be selected by considering the overall qualities of the applicant through application content, academic record, and prior experience.

Candidates accepted for admission must demonstrate and/or submit documentation of the following prior to matriculation:

Candidates accepted for admission to the DAT program will have earned a masters or higher degree from a regionally accredited institution. Applicants must submit official transcripts from college/university where the highest degree was earned.

Applicants to the Athletic Training program must demonstrate Board of Certification (BOC) certification as an athletic trainer. Verification of progress toward completion of all eligibility requirements to sit for the BOC certification examination will be accepted at the time of application, but BOC certification must be verified prior to matriculation.

Students must demonstrate proof of state licensure (if required in your current state of residence). A photocopy of a current state license is acceptable.

Candidates must have achieved a minimum overall graduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale).

Official recommendation forms must be completed by: 1) academic advisor, professor, employer, family friend or minister, and 2) a healthcare professional. A formal letter of recommendation must accompany each form. Letters from an educational consulting service will not qualify. Letters of reference must be submitted for each application year.

Candidates are expected to be computer literate and experienced in word processing. All curricula require extensive computer usage. Accepted applicants are required to have a personal computer prior to matriculation and have access to a high-speed Internet connection.

Candidates must submit an application form.

GRE scores are not required for admission to the DAT.

Applicants are required to demonstrate proficiency in English when applying to the Arizona School of Health Sciences, A.T. Still University. Written and spoken proficiency in the English language may be demonstrated by one of the following options:

  • Option 1 - English is your first language.
  • Option 2 - Graduated from a regionally accredited four year university or college in the United States (minimum BA or BS).
  • Option 3 - You are demonstrating your English proficiency by submitting acceptable scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Testing Service (IELTS).

Acceptable minimal scores for ASHS applications are:

  • Internet based total score = 80
  • Acceptable IELTS score are an overall band score of 6.5

The TOEFL is administered by TOEFL/TSE Services, P.O. Box 6151, Princeton, NJ, 08541-6151, USA 609. 771.7100. Information is available at www.toefl.org. A.T. Still University’s institutional code is 0339. Please be sure to include this information when you submit your application packet. TOEFL Educational Testing Services P.O. Box 6151 Princeton, NJ 08541-6151 609.771.7100

Candidates must complete a phone interview with the program director.

Licensure
Students must demonstrate proof of state licensure (if required in your current state of residence). A photocopy of a current state license is acceptable.

Technology Requirements

All ATSU students are required to own a computer system.

Program Outcomes

Upon completion of the Doctor of Athletic Training program at ATSU, students will be able to achieve the following outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate advanced clinical decision-making to determine the effectiveness of athletic training practice.
  2. Demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in orthopaedic rehabilitation
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of professional leadership, and evaluate and influence health policy and delivery systems, especially in the provision of athletic healthcare services.
  4. Produce an applied research project that addresses a significant clinically oriented issue relevant to athletic training practice.

Clinical Decision-Making Foundation

  • ATRN 7110: Quality Improvement and Patient Safety* (C)(M)
  • ATRN 7120: Evidence-Based Practice* (C) (M)
  • ATRN 7130: Patient-Oriented Outcomes* (C) (M)
  • ATRN 7140: Health Information Technology* (C)

ATRN 7110: Quality Improvement and Patient Safety* (C)(M)

Quality improvement is the consistent, combined effort of many to make changes in healthcare that will improve patient outcomes, system performance, and professional development. This course is designed to enhance the athletic trainer’s understanding of quality improvement, especially as it relates to patient outcomes (health), system performance (care), and professional development (learning). An overview of the history of quality improvement in healthcare will be provided to provide a global understanding of the value of quality improvement to the advancement of patient care. Additionally, the Model of Improvement will serves as the theoretical foundation for the course. Topics will include creating and managing interprofessional teams, identifying quality improvement issues, process literacy, data collection for continuous improvement, and implementing system changes. During the course, students will also be introduced to common tools used in quality improvement projects, such as process diagrams, cause-and-effect diagrams, run charts, and plan-do-study-act cycles. Achievement of course learning objectives will occur through readings, multi-media presentations, discussions, presentations, and individual and/or group assignments.

ATRN 7120: Evidence-Based Practice* (C) (M)

This course is designed to enable the athletic trainer’s clinical decision-making process in a manner that integrates clinical experience, patient values, and the best available evidence. It is also intended to build on entry-level evidence-based practice courses with the use of informatics and technology to access the medical literature. The course will cover advanced topics related to the EBP process, framing clinical questions to enhance clinical decision-making, searching the literature, critical appraisal, integration and evaluation of the evidence, grading levels of evidence and strength of recommendations, patient values, and statistical terminology related to EBP.

ATRN 7130: Patient-Oriented Outcomes* (C) (M)

Advanced Patient-Oriented Outcomes is designed to enhance the athletic trainer’s ability to employ clinician-based and patient-based clinical outcome measures for the determination of effective clinical decision-making through the practice of providing patient-centered whole person healthcare. Discussion of disablement models and outcomes research as the foundations to evidence-based practice will be provided. The use of disablement models as a framework for whole person healthcare and the evaluation of health-related quality of life will be presented. This course builds upon the basic components of clinical outcomes assessment by providing advanced content related to clinician- and patient-oriented outcomes. Instruction on the selection, implementation, and use of single- and multi-item, general and specific patient-rated outcomes instruments will be given. Details regarding the concepts of measurement properties, including assessment of measurement change, will be provided. Opportunity to develop an outcomes study through creation of a clinical question in PICO format will be provided and discussion of using practice-based research networks as means to conducting outcomes investigations will occur.

ATRN 7140: Health Information Technology* (C)

The purpose of this course is to provide the athletic trainer with a survey of relevant concepts, tools, and systems of healthcare informatics and technology that may be useful throughout the clinical decision-making process. An understanding of informatics concepts and skills related to the use of technology has been identified as critical for all modern healthcare professionals. Moreover, informatics and technology provide several distinct advantages to the modern healthcare system, including, but limited to: cost savings; error detection; quality improvement, and; improved patient outcomes.

Innovation/Winter Institute

  • ATRN 8150: Winter Institute – Innovation to Advance Athletic Health Care

ATRN 8150: Winter Institute – Innovation to Advance Athletic Health Care

The four-day intensive Winter Institute is focused on Innovation to Advance Athletic Health Care. The thread of innovation is woven throughout the course with particular emphasis on innovation to advance higher education, innovation to advance patient care, and innovation to advance research. This course is designed to promote in-depth interaction between students and faculty to facilitate the development of action plans for leading innovation in athletic health care education, patient care, and research. Students will prepare a project proposal specific to their work environment to help them develop the knowledge and skills for leading innovations within their own health care facilities and institutions. The Institute faculty consists of leading innovators in athletic health care from across the country that students will have the opportunity to learn with and from. Each faculty member will lead educational sessions in their respective area(s) of expertise and will serve as small group facilitators. Students will be mixed throughout the week into three distinct small groups that meet daily, each facilitated by an internal (ATSU) and external faculty member, to maximize opportunities for extensive interactions with peers and faculty. Study sections will be used at the beginning of each day to stimulate critical thinking and promote dialogue around the theme of the day. Project groups will meet daily to help students develop their innovative projects for leading and managing environmental change. Reflection groups will meet at the end of each day to discuss the days key points, where students experienced their greatest knowledge gains, how the information can be translated into their work setting, and what new questions may have emerged. An extensive course-reading list will be provided in advance of the face-to-face meeting and students will be required to read all course material prior to the educational sessions. In addition to the project proposal, readings, and attending the face-to-face sessions, students will be expected to complete a post-Institute assessment.

Applied Research Foundation

  • ATRN 8010: Research Methods & Design * (M)
  • ATRN 8020: Methods of Data Analysis* (M)
  • ATRN 8100: Practice-Based Research
  • ATRN 8120: Athletic Injury Epidemiology*
  • ATRN 8210: Qualitative Research Methodology
  • ATRN 9001: Analyzing the Problem
  • ATRN 9002: Proposing a Solution
  • ATRN 9003: Implementing and Evaluating the Solution
  • ATRN 9004: Completing and Disseminating the Project

ATRN 8010: Research Methods & Design * (M)

This course will focus on the development and application of graduate level knowledge and skills related to research methods in health sciences. Skills regarding the development of a research proposal, including the identification of a problem, conducting a literature review, developing a hypothesis, designing a study and submitting an Institutional Review Board application are integral components of this course.

ATRN 8020: Methods of Data Analysis* (M)

This course will focus on development and application of graduate level knowledge and skills related to the use of statistical methodology in health sciences research.

ATRN 8100: Practice-Based Research

This course aims to improve the athletic trainer’s understanding of and, ability to conduct, practice-based research. Practice-based research represents the last step of the transnational research continuum and is vital to the translation of evidence into routine clinical practice. In brief, practice-based research is conducted by clinicians at the point-of-care, with real patients, and during the usual course of patient care. To meet its purpose, this course will cover fundamental concepts related to practice-based research including but not limited to the clinician-scientist model, researcher-clinician partnerships, common study designs and statistical approaches, implementation and dissemination of evidence, and practice-based research networks.

ATRN 8120: Athletic Injury Epidemiology*

Athletic Injury Epidemiology is designed to enhance the athletic trainer’s clinical decision-making process by providing a understanding of the injury patterns associated with a variety of athletic sports. Emphasis will be placed on understanding and applying introductory principles of epidemiology, including the concepts of rates (eg, rate ratios and rate differences), incidence, proportions, odds ratios and relative risks. Students will gain experience calculating epidemiology values through class examples and exposure to national databases. Discussion of epidemiology study design (eg, cohort vs. case-control) will also be included. Evaluations of the injuries with the highest incidence and their associated risk factors will be discussed.

ATRN 8210: Qualitative Research Methodology

This course is designed to introduce the athletic trainer to the methods of qualitative research. As athletic training continues to identify ways to enhance the care provided to various populations, it is essential to integrate patients’ perspectives and preferences during the decision-making process. To effectively do so, it is important to have an understanding of the various strategies to gather this information. This course will cover the basics of qualitative research, methods to collect and analyze qualitative data, and strategies to incorporate qualitative data.

ATRN 9001: Analyzing the Problem

This course is the first in a series of four courses designed to assist you with the development of an applied research project (ARP) through the stages of reviewing the literature to project dissemination. Understanding the past and current literature around your desired research topic area is crucial to the development of a sound research project. Therefore, the purpose of this course is to provide you with the knowledge and skills to successfully review the literature around your chosen ARP topic and write a focused review of literature, which will serve as a foundational paper for your ARP.

ATRN 9002: Proposing a Solution

This course is the second in a series of four courses designed to assist you with the development of an applied research project (ARP) through the stages of reviewing the literature to project dissemination. The purpose of this course is to provide you with the knowledge and skills to develop and present the proposal for your required ARP. The proposal is crucial for the success of your ARP, as it describes in detail the research questions, hypotheses, and methodological details of your study.

During this course you will work closely with your ARP advisor to ensure your ARP proposal is methodologically sound and feasible. By the end of this course, you will have completed your ARP proposal and will present your project to your ARP advisor and submit your application to the IRB.

ATRN 9003: Implementing and Evaluating the Solution

This course is the third in a series of four courses designed to assist you with the development of an applied research project (ARP) through the stages of reviewing the literature to project dissemination. The purpose of this course is to provide you with the knowledge and skills to continue to finalize your data collection forms and sampling methodology and to successfully complete your data collection as well as properly manage your data. Additionally, this course will help you to develop and implement an analysis plan for your ARP, based on previous methodological and statistical courses, and write the bulk of your results section so that you will be ready to complete your manuscript and prepare it for dissemination in the next course.

ATRN 9004: Completing and Disseminating the Project

This course is the fourth and final course in a series of four courses designed to assist you with the development of an Applied Research Project (ARP) through the stages of reviewing the literature to project dissemination. The purpose of this course is to provide the knowledge and skills needed to successfully complete your ARP manuscript, and to identify possible strategies for the dissemination your research findings through means, such as poster and oral presentations or manuscript submission.

Rehabilitation Track/Certificate Program

  • ATRN 7210: Foundations of Tissue Healing
  • ATRN 7230: Assessment of Movement Dysfunction
  • ATRN 7240: Corrective Techniques for Movement Dysfunction
  • ATRN 7250: Rehabilitation Considerations for Sport Performance

ATRN 7210: Foundations of Tissue Healing

This course is designed to enhance the athletic trainers’ ability to plan and implement a comprehensive sports injury rehabilitation program based on the sequential biological events of connective tissue healing. Orthopaedic basic science concepts involved in clinical assessment, establishment of therapeutic objectives, and selection of therapeutic agents will be addressed. The histology, morphology, and biomechanics of soft connective tissues, muscle, articular cartilage, and peripheral nerves will be presented. Subsequently, the basic science of tissue healing following injury will be covered. Special focus is placed on the relationships between tissue healing physiology and selection of appropriate therapeutic interventions. Current topics in soft tissue healing and rehabilitation, including viscosupplementation, graft ligamentization, and biologic treatment techniques will be discussed. This course provides the orthopaedic basic science foundation for discussion of therapeutic techniques in future rehabilitation courses.

ATRN 7230: Assessment of Movement Dysfunction

This course introduces and explores the foundational concepts of structure and function as they relate to fundamental patterns of human movement. Neuro-developmental progression, motor development, motor learning, and motor control concepts will be presented. Utilizing dynamic systems theory and tensegrity models, factors contributing to movement dysfunction will be identified and techniques for movement assessment will be outlined and discussed. Following the completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in the assessment and diagnosis of movement dysfunction

ATRN 7240: Corrective Techniques for Movement Dysfunction

This course provides the athletic trainer with advanced knowledge in the rehabilitation of orthopaedic injuries, by utilizing corrective techniques to restore movement patterns and function. Emphasis is placed on integration of tensegrity and dynamic systems models to develop a sequential and progressive rehabilitation program, centered on restoration of movement patterns in fundamental, transitional, and functional postures. Concepts of mobility, sensorimotor control, movement patterning, and neurodevelopmental progression will be studied. Assisted, active, and reactive techniques for improving mobility, stability, and movement will be taught.

ATRN 7250: Rehabilitation Considerations for Sport Performance

This course provides the athletic trainer with the advanced knowledge on how to bridge the gap from rehabilitation to sport performance. Neuromuscular considerations such as psychomotor and somatosensory control will be explored. Considerations for strength training, time under tension, power development and athletic movement prescription will be examined. Following this course, the athletic trainer will be able to develop a comprehensive program for the athlete who is returning to sport post-injury.

Orthopaedics Track/Certificate Program

  • ATRN 7410: Orthopaedic Diagnostic Evaluation
  • ATRN 7430: Orthopaedic Imaging and Labs
  • ATRN 7220: Orthopaedic Surgical Considerations
  • ATRN 7420: Orthopaedic Management

ATRN 7410: Orthopaedic Diagnostic Evaluation

This course is designed to provide the athletic trainer with advanced knowledge and clinical skills in the pathology, examination, and diagnosis of orthopaedic and sport-related injuries to the upper and lower extremities, the back, and spine. Content is presented with an emphasis on integrating evidence-based practice principles to enhance the student’s clinical decision-making skills in injury evaluation and diagnosis. Focus will be placed on developing clinical reasoning skills to enhance the student’s ability to accurately and efficiently utilize the physical examination and diagnostic tests to evaluate complex orthopaedic conditions, recognize atypical presentations, identify non-orthopaedic conditions that present as orthopaedic conditions, and recommend and interpret appropriate imaging and laboratory tests. Students will engage in weekly collaborative learning activities and independent assignments to enhance their clinical skills in Orthopaedic Diagnostic Evaluation.

ATRN 7430: Orthopaedic Imaging and Labs

This course is designed to enhance the athletic trainer’s knowledge regarding common imaging and laboratory techniques used in the management of orthopaedic patients. Students will be exposed to various imaging modalities including radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, CT scans, and musculoskeletal ultrasound. The use of laboratory tests for injury and illness will also be examined. Students will engage in weekly collaborative learning activities and independent assignments to evaluate the sensitivity and utility of imaging and laboratory tests used in athletic health care.

ATRN 7220: Orthopaedic Surgical Considerations

This course is designed to enhance the athletic trainer’s knowledge and awareness of special considerations for rehabilitation following common orthopaedic surgeries. The course focuses on improving the athletic trainer’s ability to provide quality education and counseling to their orthopaedic patients through the development of advanced knowledge and skills in post-surgical rehabilitation. Surgical techniques for common orthopaedic conditions of the upper and lower extremities will be presented. Tissue response to surgery, post-surgical rehabilitation guidelines and timelines, and surgical outcomes will be discussed. Students will engage in weekly collaborative learning activities to critically appraise the current evidence for post-surgical rehabilitation approaches. The course culminates with the development of a comprehensive, evidence-based post-surgical rehabilitation protocol for an orthopaedic surgery of the student’s choice.

ATRN 7420: Orthopaedic Management

This course is designed to enhance the athletic trainers’ ability to effectively manage patients with increasingly complex orthopaedic conditions. Content focuses on management of complex orthopaedic conditions with and without co-morbidities and includes the development prioritized care plans, strategies to maximize long-term health related quality of life, identifying criteria and plans for safe return to participation and to maximize sports performance, engaging in patient education. Students will engage in weekly collaborative learning activities and independent assignments to enhance their clinical skills in Orthopaedic Management.

Leadership and Education Track/Certificate Program

  • ATRN 8140: Leadership and Professionalism in Athletic Training
  • ATRN 8130: Healthcare Policy and Systems of Delivery*
  • ATRN 8160: Contemporary Issues in Athletic Training Education
  • ATRN 8170: Applied Clinical Education and Mentoring

ATRN 8140: Leadership and Professionalism in Athletic Training

This course offers an examination and application of theories of professionalism and leadership as they related to various aspects of the practice of athletic training. Topics include, but are not limited to: Contemporary leadership theories, Medical professionalism, Organizational communication, Personal effectiveness and productivity, Communities of practice, Leading change, and Conflict management. The course requires students to be active participants in the learning process. We will rely on a series of readings (eg book chapters, classic and contemporary articles, research studies), presentations, discussions, and both reflective and authentic applied assignments to provide a deeper understanding of leadership and professionalism and their impact the athletic training profession. By the end of this course you should have the foundational knowledge and a framework for action that will allow you to make informed decisions about your own leadership roles and pursue meaningful change in both your work setting and your profession.

ATRN 8130: Healthcare Policy and Systems of Delivery*

This course provides a forum for exploration and discussion of current policy issues and trends in healthcare in general, and in athletic training more specifically. The course attempts to do three things: The first half of the course takes a broader approach to examine the U.S. health care system from a health policy and health politics perspective. Topics include general civics, the role of state and federal government in law and policy making, as well as organizing, financing, and delivering health care. The second half of the course will look more specifically at emerging policy issues. The second half of the course is designed to enhance the athletic trainer’s understanding of legal and risk management concepts as they pertain to daily clinical practice and the administration thereof. Concepts will include: accreditation, cardiac, heat and hydration, injury prevention and sport specialization, and concussion policy analysis.

ATRN 8160: Contemporary Issues in Athletic Training Education

This course that will explore contemporary issues in athletic training education, with special emphasis on the continuum of education from professional programs through residency and fellowship training to post-professional degree programs, such as the Doctor of Athletic Training and Doctor of Philosophy degrees, as well as continuing education and maintenance of competence. A global perspective of the structure of health professions education, accreditation, and current issues in higher education will be explored. Students will develop insights and discuss implications for the ever-changing nature of health professions education, with a focus on contemporary issues in athletic training education.

ATRN 8170: Applied Clinical Education and Mentoring

This course is intended to improve the student’s understanding and application of best practices in clinical education and mentoring in athletic training professional education and residency/fellowship training programs. Focus will be on best practices regarding bridging the gap between didactic and clinical education, clinical education techniques and models, preceptor mentoring, and student/resident/fellow mentorship models. Focused discussion regarding developing assessment activities at the point-of-care to facilitate practice-based research is included. Contemporary issues in clinical education, facilitating transition to practice, and mentoring within the health professions will also be presented.

Sports Neurology and Concussion Track/Certificate Program

  • ATRN 7310: Foundations of Sport Neurology
  • ATRN 7320: Diagnosis and Management of Neurologic Conditions in Sport
  • ATRN 7330: Classification and Management of Traumatic Head Injury
  • ATRN 7340: Assessment and Management of Complex Patients with Concussion

ATRN 7310: Foundations of Sport Neurology

This course is designed to enhance the athletic trainers’ ability to manage neurological injuries resulting from participation in sports and physical activity. Basic science concepts regarding neurological mechanisms of pain, pathophysiology of neurologic injuries, neurodynamics, and the psychological contributions of pain will be discussed. This course will serve as a foundation to the other courses in the Sports Neurology and Concussion track or graduate certificate program.

ATRN 7320: Diagnosis and Management of Neurologic Conditions in Sport

This course is designed to enhance the students’ knowledge and skills regarding the recognition, assessment, management, and referral of patients who present with neurologic conditions. Specific attention will be placed on understanding red flags for various conditions, diagnostic testing, and appropriate care for various conditions. The course will use a mix of online readings, videos, and discussion forums to foster collaboration among students.

ATRN 7330: Classification and Management of Traumatic Head Injury

This course is designed to expand the student’s understanding of traumatic head injury. The course will span the spectrum of head injury from catastrophic head injury with internal hemorrhage to mild traumatic brain injury or concussion. Specifics regarding assessment, treatment, and management will be presented. The course will use a mix of online readings, videos, and discussion forums to foster collaboration among students.

ATRN 7340: Assessment and Management of Complex Patients with Concussion

This course will provide a thorough examination of the treatment of patients with complex medical concerns who suffer a concussion. Specific attention will be focused on the patient’s past medical history and co-morbid factors and how these may influence the assessment, treatment, and management of head injuries. The course will use a mix of online readings, videos, and discussion forums to foster collaboration among students.

Elective Tracks

Required Foundations

Cost

Note: All fees and tuition are subject to change.

The Doctor of Athletic Training online program consists of 69 credit-hours of study. Most courses are three credit hours, except for the Winter Institute and ARP courses, which are 4 credit hours each. There are additional fees for books, reference materials, Winter Institute travel and accommodations.

  • Application Fee: $70
  • Tuition: $534 per credit hour (2018 - 2019 school year)

Financial Services

Federal financial assistance is available for qualifying students. For information on financial aid, visit ATSU’s Student Financial Services online or contact them at 866.626.2878 ext. 2529 or by email at financialaidonline@atsu.edu.

Doctor of Athletic Training Online Degree Faculty

Renowned faculty are recognized experts with national influence who share emerging trends and opportunities in athletic training practice and education.

Interaction with a variety of instructors offers students exposure to a variety of teaching styles, healthcare- and education-related backgrounds and experiences that contribute to a well-rounded education fostering personal and professional growth.

Tamara C. Valovich McLeod, PhD, ATC, FNATA
Tamara C. Valovich McLeod, PhD, ATC, FNATA

Read Bio
+
Grey LinkedIn logo

Tamara C. Valovich McLeod, PhD, ATC, FNATA, is the Athletic Training program director, professor of Athletic Training, research professor in the School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, and the John P. Wood, DO, endowed chair for Sports Medicine at A.T. Still University in Mesa, Arizona.

Dr. McLeod completed her doctor of philosophy degree in education with an emphasis in sports medicine from the University of Virginia. She is the founding director of the Athletic Training Practice-Based Research Network. Her research has focused on the pediatric athlete with respect to sport-related concussion. Her current work is investigating the short- and long-term effects of pediatric sports concussion as well as recovery following concussion on traditional concussion assessments, academics, and health-related quality of life.

Dr. McLeod is also involved with pediatric sports injury education and prevention through the Positive Play Project in conjunction with Mesa Parks and Recreation.

Dr. McLeod was a contributing author for the NATA Position Statement on the Management of Sport-Related Concussion, the lead author on the NATA Position Statement on the Prevention of Pediatric Overuse Injuries, and a consultant and contributing author on the Appropriate Medical Coverage for Secondary School-Aged Athletes. Dr. McLeod serves on numerous editorial boards, and publishes frequently in the athletic training and sports medicine journals and is a NATA Fellow.​

Eric Sauers, PhD, ATC, FNATA
Eric Sauers, PhD, ATC, FNATA

Read Bio
+
Grey LinkedIn logo

Eric L. Sauers, PhD, ATC, FNATA, is a tenured full professor and chair of the Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences at A. T. Still University (ATSU), in Mesa, Arizona. Dr. Sauers also holds a joint appointment as a research professor in the ATSU School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona. Dr. Sauers received his bachelor’s degree in exercise science from Seattle Pacific University, his master of science degree in sports health care from ATSU, and his doctor of philosophy degree in sports medicine and adult/university education at Oregon State University. Dr. Sauers has a special interest in both institutional and programmatic accreditation, having co-chaired his institutions regional accreditation site visit, written programmatic accreditation self-studies, and conducted numerous programmatic accreditation site visits. As the founding chair of the Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences, Dr. Sauers planned and implemented the online Human Movement program, the online Doctor of Health Sciences (DHSc) program, and the online Doctor of Athletic Training (DAT) program. He currently oversees the online DAT program in addition to overseeing the Master of Science in Athletic Training program, the Human Anatomy Unit, and the Biostatistics and Clinical Research Unit. Dr. Sauers served as the director of the Master of Science in Athletic Training program from 2000 to 2009. His primary research and scholarly interests are related to the assessment of clinical outcomes and health-related quality of life in athletes following musculoskeletal injury, the examination and rehabilitation of the athletic shoulder and health professions education and accreditation. Dr. Sauers has published numerous peer-reviewed scientific articles and given numerous state, regional, and national presentations related to his research and scholarship. He served as the first active member and then president of the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists (ASSET) that was not dual-credentialed. He has served as a commissioner and the vice president of the Commission on the Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Dr. Sauers was responsible for the visioning and development of the first and only Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research recognized practice-based research network in the athletic training discipline and currently serves as the associate director of the ATSU Athletic Training Practice-Based Research Network (AT-PBRN). The AT-PBRN utilizes a web-based electronic medical record that Dr. Sauers helped to design and develop to enable efficient clinical documentation of patient care while supporting back-end mining of a national clinical practice database. He is the associate editor for Clinical Outcomes for the Journal of Sport Rehabilitation and an editorial board member for the Journal of Athletic Training and the Athletic Training Education Journal. He has previously served as the chair of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) Post-Professional Education Committee and as a member of the NATA Education Council Executive Committee. He has received the President’s Award from the Arizona Athletic Trainers’ Association, the Distinguished Educator Award from the Rocky Mountain Athletic Trainers’ Association, and has been recognized for his dedication to the athletic training profession with the distinction as a Fellow of the NATA.

Barton E. Anderson, DHSc, AT, ATC
Barton E. Anderson, DHSc, AT, ATC

Read Bio
+
Grey LinkedIn logo

​Barton E. Anderson, DHSc, AT, ATC, is an associate professor in ATSU’s Athletic Training (AT) programs, serving as the primary clinical faculty member and clinical education coordinator for the Residential Post-Professional Master’s program. Dr. Anderson oversees all aspects of the Advanced Clinical Practice program (Clinical Education), including establishing and maintaining graduate assistantships, coordinating affiliated clinical sites and preceptors, and providing clinical mentoring to AT program students. Dr. Anderson holds a Level 1 Functional Movement Screen™ certification, and is an accredited Graston Technique™ clinician and Graston™ faculty instructor. He has extensive experience and training in therapeutic exercise prescription, fundamental movement patterns, and manual therapy techniques. Prior to ATSU, Dr. Anderson worked clinically for 10 years as an athletic trainer in the collegiate, high school, and clinical settings. He continues his clinical practice part-time throughout the academic year at a local sports medicine clinic. Dr. Anderson is a member of the CAATE Standards Committee, and also serves as the electronic medical record manager within the Athletic Training Practice Based Research Network, the chair of the Arizona Athletic Trainers’ Association Communications Committee, and the AzATA website coordinator. He earned his bachelor’s of science in sports medicine and athletic training from Missouri State University, his master’s of science in sports health care from ATSU, and his doctor of health science degree from Nova Southeastern University.

Cailee Welch Bacon, PhD, ATC
Cailee Welch Bacon, PhD, ATC

Read Bio
+
Grey LinkedIn logo

Cailee E. Welch Bacon, PhD, ATC, is an associate professor in the Athletic Training program within the Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences as well as a research associate professor in the Department of Basic Science in A.T. Still University’s School of Osteopathic Medicine. Dr. Bacon earned her bachelor of science degree in athletic training from Boston University, followed by a master of science in education degree in athletic training from Old Dominion University. She also earned her doctor of philosophy degree in human movement science with a focus in athletic training curriculum and instruction from Old Dominion University, where she investigated the effectiveness of educational techniques to aid athletic trainers in learning the fundamentals of evidence-based practice. Dr. Bacon also completed a post-doctoral research fellowship within the Center for Clinical Outcome Studies at ATSU, which focused on patient-oriented outcomes and athletic training educational research. Currently, she serves as the clinical practice site coordinator within the Athletic Training Practice-Based Research Network (AT-PBRN), which includes conducting the education and training for athletic trainers across the country, and is an Associate Editor for the Athletic Training Education Journal. Additionally, Dr. Bacon currently serves on the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education Review Committee, the Educational Advancement Committee under the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Executive Committee for Education, and the Journal of Athletic Training Editorial Board. Dr. Bacon’s research agenda focuses on athletic training education. Specifically, she is interested in assessing athletic training educational outcomes related to competency-based education and identifying interventions to enhance knowledge translation throughout the athletic training profession.

Sue Falsone, PT, MS, SCS, ATC, L-AT, CSCS, COMT, RYT
Sue Falsone, PT, MS, SCS, ATC, L-AT, CSCS, COMT, RYT

Read Bio
+

Sue Falsone, PT, MS, SCS, ATC, L-AT, CSCS, COMT, RYT, is an associate professor in ATSU-ASHS Athletic Training program. She teaches courses within the athletic training Master of Science degree program and online courses in orthopaedic rehabilitation foundation within the online Doctor of Athletic Training program. She also serves as a clinician scientist within the school’s Athletic Training Practice-Based Research Network.

Ms. Falsone’s many accomplishments include being the first female head athletic trainer in any of the four major American professional sports leagues, when she was named the head athletic trainer for the LA Dodgers in 2012. She also served as the head of athletic training and sport performance for the U.S. Men’s National Soccer Team. She is known internationally for her expertise in sport rehabilitation and performance enhancement and bridging between physical therapy and return to sport.

An alumna of Daemen College, Ms. Falsone graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a master’s degree in human movement science; is owner and founder of Structure and Function Education, an educational company working to bring the concepts, philosophies and techniques of dry needling to the allied healthcare professional.

Kenneth C. Lam, ScD, ATC
Kenneth C. Lam, ScD, ATC

Read Bio
+
Grey LinkedIn logo

Kenneth C. Lam, ScD, ATC, is an associate professor of clinical research within the Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences at A.T. Still University (ATSU).

He received a bachelor of science in athletic training and a master of education in human movement from Boston University. He also completed his doctor of science degree from Boston University with a focus on movement sciences. Prior to becoming a faculty member at ATSU, Dr. Lam completed a Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship within the Center of Clinical Outcomes Studies at ATSU with a focus on patient-oriented outcomes research.

His current line of research seeks to understand the overall impact of sport-related lower extremity injuries on patient-oriented outcomes such as health-related quality of life. In addition to his faculty responsibilities, Dr. Lam serves as the director of the Athletic Training Practice-Based Research Network (AT-PBRN) and as the vice chair of the Institutional Review Board at ATSU - Mesa campus. He also serves as an editorial board member of the Journal of Athletic Training and Journal of Sport Rehabilitation and is the Chair of the the Free Communications Committee of the Rocky Mountain Athletic Trainers’ Association. Prior to earning his doctorate, Dr. Lam practiced as a certified athletic trainer at Boston University, Rutgers University - New Brunswick, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.​

Alison Snyder Valier, PhD, ATC, FNATA
Alison Snyder Valier, PhD, ATC, FNATA

Read Bio
+
Grey LinkedIn logo

Alison Valier, PhD, ATC, FNATA, serves as a professor in the Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences and assistant director of research support through Research, Grants, and Information Technology Systems.

She received her bachelor of arts degree in psychology from Whitman College in Washington and a master of science degree in exercise physiology at the University of Toledo in Ohio. In addition, she received her doctorate in exercise science from the University of Toledo, where she majored in applied physiology and completed a minor in human anatomy. Dr. Valier completed a Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship in Clinical Outcomes Research, awarded to her by the NATA Research and Education Foundation.

Dr. Valier’s teaching emphasizes the assessment of clinical outcomes and evaluating the end result of healthcare services, sports injury epidemiology, and quality improvement. She instructs in both the Post-Professional Athletic Training and the Doctor of Athletic Training programs. Her primary research area of interest is in studying the impact of sport-related injury on the HRQOL of high school and college athletes. Another area of interest involves the use and development of patient-reported outcomes instruments that are used to facilitate patient centered care and evaluate patient outcomes. Further, she is interested in better understanding risks and rates of injury through epidemiology research as well as optimizing athletic training systems of care through quality improvement research.

Dr. Valier has served in a variety of service roles to the profession. More recently she has served as a member of the NATA Pronouncements Committee and the Foundation Research Committee. She also serves as the co-chair of the Arizona Athletic Trainers’ Association Governmental Affairs Committee. In 2015, she was accepted as a Fellow of the NATA.

R. Curtis Bay, PhD
R. Curtis Bay, PhD

Read Bio
+
Grey LinkedIn logo

Dr. Bay, is a professor of biostatistics in the Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences. For the 12 years prior to joining ATSU, Dr. Bay served as director of medical research, Department of Academic Affairs, Maricopa Medical Center, in Phoenix. He is a graduate of Arizona State University, where he received a doctorate in psychology, with an emphasis in statistical methodology. Dr. Bay teaches courses in research methodology and statistical analysis. His current areas of interest concerns the relationship between patients’ illness epistemology and their subjective and objective responses to therapeutic interventions, as well as the application of structural equation modeling to medical research.​

Sara Brown, MS, ATC
Sara Brown, MS, ATC

Read Bio
+

Ms. Sara Brown is an adjunct faculty member for the DAT Winter Institute and has attended every institute since the launch of the DAT. She is a graduate of Miami University and the University of Arizona has been the director of the athletic training program at Boston University since 1991. She. In addition to her duties as a clinical associate professor at BU, she completed a four-year term as the chair of the NATA’s Executive Committee for Education in 2013. She is now chair of the Standards Committee for the CAATE. Previously, Sara has held positions on the BOC Board of Directors including BOC President and BOC Vice President. She is a co-author with Chad Starkey of Examination of Orthopedic and Athletic Injuries, a textbook on orthopedic assessment, and has been teaching at the college level for 30 years.

Mark Laursen, MS, ATC
Mark Laursen, MS, ATC

Read Bio
+

R. Mark Laursen, MS, ATC, was selected as Boston University’s Director of Athletic Training Services in June 2008. At that time, he also was named a Clinical Associate Professor of Athletic Training in BU’s Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences. No stranger to BU, Laursen has served in numerous capacities at the University since 1983, when he first joined the Department of Athletics as an assistant soccer coach for two seasons. He has worked as a Clinical Assistant Professor of Athletic Training and is a Faculty in Residence in the Office of Residence Life. Mr. Laursen is an adjunct faculty member for the DAT Winter Institute and has participated since the founding of the program.

From July 2007 to May 2008, he was a clinical instructor at the University of South Carolina. As a member of its graduate faculty, he coordinated all graduate clinical education. Additionally, from 1993-1998 he was the Head Athletic Trainer at Washington College at Chestertown, MD. He has contributed too many publications, has made more than 90 presentations, and is a reviewer for Athletic Therapy Today and The Journal of Athletic Training. He has served as the Treasurer, Vice President and President of the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). He has visited over 20 schools’ athletic training programs as an Evaluation Team Member or Team Chair for NATA’s Professional Education Committee, CAAHEP and CAATE. He has been awarded Athletic Trainer of the Year from Athletic Trainers of Massachusetts (2013) and NATA’s Head Athletic Trainer of the Year (2007), Service Award (2009) and Most Distinguished Athletic Trainer (2016). Laursen has volunteered as an Athletic Trainer at numerous sporting events including the Boston Marathon, NCAA championships for men’s basketball, men’s ice hockey and wrestling, and U.S. Figure Skating Challenges. A 1983 graduate of Appalachian State University with a Bachelor of Science degree, Laursen majored in Health Education and minored in Athletic Training. He earned his Master of Science degree in 1986 from Canisius College.

Forrest Pecha, MS, ATC, LAT, OTC, CSCS
Forrest Pecha, MS, ATC, LAT, OTC, CSCS

Read Bio
+

Mr. Pecha serves as Director of Clinical Residency and Outreach at St. Luke’s Sports Medicine. He developed St. Luke’s post-professional, CAATE accredited, athletic training residency program and started the athletic training residency program at Emory Sports Medicine in Atlanta GA. He serves as an adjunct professor for the DAT Winter Institute. Forrest currently serves as a CAATE site visitor and review team member, as well as, a member of CAATE accreditation conference planning committee. He also served on the recent athletic training practice analysis, 7th addition, for Board of Certification. Forrest is the NATA Liaison to American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) and serves as the president for the newly formed Athletic Trainers in the Physician Practice Society, ATPPS. Forrest has been invited to speak nationally and internationally on the clinical roles, improving physician practice efficiencies, and the value of athletic trainers. He has been published multiple times through both peer-reviewed journals and professional articles on the value of athletic trainers. He was head athletic trainer for the U.S. Men’s Alpine Ski Team, participating in the 2002 Olympic winter games, and athletic trainer for the U.S. Men’s U-20 World Cup and qualifying tournaments. Forrest earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin - La Crosse, and his master’s degree from Illinois State University.

David H. Perrin, PhD
David H. Perrin, PhD

Read Bio
+

David H. Perrin is Dean of the College of Health and Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training at the University of Utah. He serves as an adjunct faculty member for the DAT Winter Institute and has been a contributor to the institute since 206.

From 2007 – 2014 he served as Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and as Dean of the School of Health and Human Performance at UNCG from 2001-2007. Dr. Perrin’s career as an administrator began in 1995 in the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia where he served as program area director of Kinesiology (then Health and Physical Education). In 1999, he was appointed Chair of the Department of Human Services at UVa. He received his BS in Physical Education from Castleton State College, MA in Athletic Training from Indiana State University, and PhD in Exercise Physiology from the University of Pittsburgh.

Dr. Perrin was editor-in-chief of the Journal of Athletic Training for eight years (1996-2004) and founding editor of the Journal of Sport Rehabilitation (1990-1995). He is author of Isokinetic Exercise and Assessment and Athletic Taping and Bracing, 3nd Edition (with translations in Japanese, Greek, Chinese, Portuguese, Korean and French), editor of The Injured Athlete, Third Edition, and coauthor of Examination of Musculoskeletal Injuries and Research Methods in Athletic Training. He also served as series editor of the 5-textbook Athletic Training Education Series.

For 15 years Dr. Perrin directed the graduate programs in Athletic Training (MEd) and Sports Medicine (PhD & EdD) at the University of Virginia. He was named the Joe Gieck Professor of Sports Medicine, founded the Sports Medicine and Athletic Training Research Laboratory, and mentored over 50 students who received a doctoral degree in Sports Medicine. His primary research interest, funded by the National Institutes of Health, focused on anterior cruciate ligament injury risk factors in female athletes.

From 2007 to 2011 he served on the Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages, Bureau of Health Professions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. As a faculty member, he was recipient of a University of Virginia All-University Outstanding Teaching Award in 1997 and in 1998 received the Curry School of Education Foundation’s Outstanding Professor Award. His professional awards from the National Athletic Trainers’ Association include the Sayers “Bud” Miller Distinguished Educator Award in 1996, the Most Distinguished Athletic Trainer award in 1998, the William G. Clancy, Jr., MD Medal for Distinguished Athletic Training Research in 1999, and induction into the Hall of Fame in 2003. In 2015 he received the NATA Research & Education Foundation’s Lifetime Contribution Award. Among his honors are distinguished alumni awards from CSC, ISU, and Pitt, including induction into the Legacy Laureate Society at the University of Pittsburgh in 2008. In 2009 he received an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from the Arizona School of Health Sciences at A.T. Still University.

Karen G. Roos, PhD, MSPT, ATC
Karen G. Roos, PhD, MSPT, ATC

Hayley Root, PhD, MPH, ATC
Hayley Root, PhD, MPH, ATC

Read Bio
+

Dr. Hayley Root is a post-doctoral research fellow in pediatric sports medicine at A.T. Still University in Mesa, Arizona. After receiving her bachelor’s degree in exercise science with a concentration in athletic training from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dr. Root completed both her Masters in Public Health and PhD in Kinesiology at the University of Connecticut. She uses her background in public health and athletic training collectively to better translate and disseminate evidence-based practice. Her research interests include lower extremity musculoskeletal injury prevention strategies, particularly in youth sport, with a focus on dissemination and implementation strategies. Dr. Root instructs ATRN 8130: Healthcare Policy and Systems of Delivery.

Andrea Lopes Sauers, PhD
Andrea Lopes Sauers, PhD

Read Bio
+

Dr Andrea Lopes Sauers is an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Doctor of Athletic Training (DAT) Program. She received her bachelor’s degree in Physical Therapy at Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas de Minas Gerais, Brazil. She has been a licensed Physical Therapist in Brazil since 2004 and her graduate academic and specialty training has been in the area of orthopaedics. She earned a certificate of specialization from the Brazilian Federal Board of Physical Therapy after completing a year of residency training in the specialty area of orthopaedics at the Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP). Dr. Lopes Sauers then completed a two-year fellowship program in shoulder rehabilitation and a Master’s degree in orthopaedics from UNIFESP. Following the completion of her Master’s degree, she practiced orthopaedic physical therapy for seven years working in both the inpatient and outpatient units within Albert Einstein Hospital in Sao Paulo. She earned her PhD in Translational Medicine from UNIFESP in 2013. She completed a two-year Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in Clinical Outcomes Studies at ATSU from 2014-2016. Her research interests are in continuous quality improvement in healthcare and clinical outcomes following rehabilitative interventions in patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Specifically, she is interested in study strategies for assessing the value of care and to measure and improve care delivery. Dr. Lopes Sauers has published and presented original research investigations related to patient-oriented outcomes. She currently teaches ATRN 7110: Quality Improvement and Patient Safety in the DAT Program.

Kim Terrell, MS, ATC
Kim Terrell, MS, ATC

Read Bio
+

Kim Terrell, MS, ATC is Associate Director of Athletic Medicine at University of Oregon, overseeing Athletic Training services and providing care for intercollegiate athletes, while also serving as the Clinical Coordinator in the Post Professional Graduate Athletic Training Program and Courtesy Faculty member in the Department of Human Physiology. This affords opportunities to mentor staff as well as post professional graduate students, and support clinical education and research. Kim returned to her alma mater in 2003 after serving as the Director of Sports Medicine at Northeastern University since 1995. After receiving her Master’s Degree in Exercise and Movement Science from University of Oregon, Kim provided Athletic Training services in clinical settings and high school outreach prior to returning to University of Oregon as an Assistant Athletic Trainer in 1988. Kim is a previous BOC Board of Directors member, and has served on the NATA College and University Athletic Trainers Committee. Ms. Terrell is an adjunct faculty member for the DAT Winter Institute and has assisted in ATRN 8140 Leadership and Professionalism in Athletic Training.

Stacey Walker, PhD, ATC
Stacey Walker, PhD, ATC

Read Bio
+

Stacy E. Walker, PhD, ATC is a tenured Associate Professor of Athletic Training at Ball State University. She serves as an adjunct faculty member for the DAT Winter Institute. She has over 30 peer reviewed journal articles, more than 40 professional presentations. Her research agenda focuses on the use of standardized patients to provide additional clinical education experiences for athletic training students and the transition to practice of newly credentialed athletic trainers. She received the Great Lakes Athletic Trainers’ Association Outstanding Educator Award in 2014. She is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Athletic Training and the Athletic Training Education Journal and is a member of the NATA Research and Education Foundation Research Committee, the Board of Certifications Maintenance of Certification Task Force the Association of Standardized Patient Educators Grants and Research Committee and serves as a CAATE Site visitor. She obtained her bachelor of science degree from Southern Illinois University, a masters in rehabilitative science from Clarion University and a masters degree in athletic training from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga followed by her Doctor of Philosophy degree in administration and teaching from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Richelle M. Williams, PhD, ATC
Richelle M. Williams, PhD, ATC

Read Bio
+

Dr. Richelle Williams is an adjunct assistant professor in the DAT and instructs ATRN 7110: Quality Improvement and Patient Safety. She completed a post-doctoral research fellowship in clinical outcome studies with Dr. Alison Valier at A.T. Still University in 2018. Dr. Williams received her bachelor’s degree in Kinesiology with an emphasis in athletic training from San Diego State University, followed by her master’s in athletic training from A.T. Still University. Dr. Williams earned her PhD from the University of Michigan in Kinesiology with a focus on pediatric sport-related concussions. Her research interests related to healthcare clinical outcomes following pediatric sport-related concussion.

Andrew P. Winterstein, PhD, ATC
Andrew P. Winterstein, PhD, ATC

Read Bio
+

Andrew P. Winterstein is a clinical professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Wisconsin – Madison where he currently serves as the program director of the athletic training professional preparation program. A graduate of the University of Arizona, University of Oregon, and the University of Wisconsin‐Madison; Dr.Winterstein has been active in athletic training patient care and educational programming at UW‐Madison since 1986. Dr. Winterstein serves as an adjunct professor for the DAT Winter Institute and is the primary course professor for ATRN 8140: Leadership and Professionalism in Athletic Training.

Dr. Winterstein’s academic interests include: emerging technologies and their use in teaching and learning, medical humanities and their application to athletic training education, organizational dynamics, educational interventions/behavioral change, and patient‐reported outcome measures following injury. His papers and abstracts have appeared a variety athletic training and sports medicine journals and he has been privileged to make numerous professional presentations at state, regional, national, and international conferences.

He is the author of three textbooks: The Athletic Training Student Primer (Slack, Inc), Administrative Topics in Athletic Training: Concepts to Practice (Slack, Inc) with Greg Gardner and Gary Harrelson, and The Athletic Trainers Guide to Differential Diagnosis: A Visual Learning Approach (Slack, Inc) co‐authored with Sharon Clark.

Dr. Winterstein has received numerous awards, including the 2016, NATA Most

Distinguished Athletic Trainer Award, 2008 Great Lakes Athletic Training Association Outstanding Educator Award, 2007 Wisconsin Athletic Trainers’ Association Outstanding Educator Award, and the 2006 UW‐Madison School of Education Distinguished Service Award. He and his colleagues are three‐time winners of the NATA Educational Multimedia Committee award for educational innovations and have been awarded the MERLOT Classics Award for exemplary on‐line learning objects.

Tamara C. Valovich McLeod, PhD, ATC, FNATA
Tamara C. Valovich McLeod, PhD, ATC, FNATA
Director
Read Bio
+
Grey LinkedIn logo

Tamara C. Valovich McLeod, PhD, ATC, FNATA, is the Athletic Training program director, professor of Athletic Training, research professor in the School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, and the John P. Wood, DO, endowed chair for Sports Medicine at A.T. Still University in Mesa, Arizona.

Dr. McLeod completed her doctor of philosophy degree in education with an emphasis in sports medicine from the University of Virginia. She is the founding director of the Athletic Training Practice-Based Research Network. Her research has focused on the pediatric athlete with respect to sport-related concussion. Her current work is investigating the short- and long-term effects of pediatric sports concussion as well as recovery following concussion on traditional concussion assessments, academics, and health-related quality of life.

Dr. McLeod is also involved with pediatric sports injury education and prevention through the Positive Play Project in conjunction with Mesa Parks and Recreation.

Dr. McLeod was a contributing author for the NATA Position Statement on the Management of Sport-Related Concussion, the lead author on the NATA Position Statement on the Prevention of Pediatric Overuse Injuries, and a consultant and contributing author on the Appropriate Medical Coverage for Secondary School-Aged Athletes. Dr. McLeod serves on numerous editorial boards, and publishes frequently in the athletic training and sports medicine journals and is a NATA Fellow.​

Eric Sauers, PhD, ATC, FNATA
Eric Sauers, PhD, ATC, FNATA
Chair
Read Bio
+
Grey LinkedIn logo

Eric L. Sauers, PhD, ATC, FNATA, is a tenured full professor and chair of the Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences at A. T. Still University (ATSU), in Mesa, Arizona. Dr. Sauers also holds a joint appointment as a research professor in the ATSU School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona. Dr. Sauers received his bachelor’s degree in exercise science from Seattle Pacific University, his master of science degree in sports health care from ATSU, and his doctor of philosophy degree in sports medicine and adult/university education at Oregon State University. Dr. Sauers has a special interest in both institutional and programmatic accreditation, having co-chaired his institutions regional accreditation site visit, written programmatic accreditation self-studies, and conducted numerous programmatic accreditation site visits. As the founding chair of the Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences, Dr. Sauers planned and implemented the online Human Movement program, the online Doctor of Health Sciences (DHSc) program, and the online Doctor of Athletic Training (DAT) program. He currently oversees the online DAT program in addition to overseeing the Master of Science in Athletic Training program, the Human Anatomy Unit, and the Biostatistics and Clinical Research Unit. Dr. Sauers served as the director of the Master of Science in Athletic Training program from 2000 to 2009. His primary research and scholarly interests are related to the assessment of clinical outcomes and health-related quality of life in athletes following musculoskeletal injury, the examination and rehabilitation of the athletic shoulder and health professions education and accreditation. Dr. Sauers has published numerous peer-reviewed scientific articles and given numerous state, regional, and national presentations related to his research and scholarship. He served as the first active member and then president of the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists (ASSET) that was not dual-credentialed. He has served as a commissioner and the vice president of the Commission on the Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Dr. Sauers was responsible for the visioning and development of the first and only Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research recognized practice-based research network in the athletic training discipline and currently serves as the associate director of the ATSU Athletic Training Practice-Based Research Network (AT-PBRN). The AT-PBRN utilizes a web-based electronic medical record that Dr. Sauers helped to design and develop to enable efficient clinical documentation of patient care while supporting back-end mining of a national clinical practice database. He is the associate editor for Clinical Outcomes for the Journal of Sport Rehabilitation and an editorial board member for the Journal of Athletic Training and the Athletic Training Education Journal. He has previously served as the chair of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) Post-Professional Education Committee and as a member of the NATA Education Council Executive Committee. He has received the President’s Award from the Arizona Athletic Trainers’ Association, the Distinguished Educator Award from the Rocky Mountain Athletic Trainers’ Association, and has been recognized for his dedication to the athletic training profession with the distinction as a Fellow of the NATA.

Annlee Burch, PT, MPH, EdD
Annlee Burch, PT, MPH, EdD
Vice Dean
Read Bio
+
Grey LinkedIn logo

Dr. Burch is Vice Dean of the Arizona School of Health Sciences. Her primary responsibility is to serve as Chief Operating Officer of the School under the direction of the Dean. In addition, she leads several University or School wide initiatives including the Diversity Initiative Task Force and the ASHS Adelante Project. In her role, Dr. Burch represents the School in the Dean’s absence.

Dr. Burch received her Doctor of Education (EdD) from Columbia University, Teachers College in 2005. She received her Masters of Public Health (MPH) from Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health in 2002 and her Masters of Physical Therapy (MS) from Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1989. She was a postdoctoral fellow with the Research Group on Health Disparities at Teachers College, Columbia University.

Dr. Burch received her BA is in Psychology from the University of Rochester. Prior to her appointment as Vice Dean, Dr. Burch served as the Chair of Physical Therapy from 2008-January 2012. Prior to coming to ATSU, Dr. Burch was the Director of Physical Therapy at the University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus in San Juan, Puerto Rico. She has held administrative and/or faculty positions at the International Center for the Disabled in NY, NY, Mercy College in NY, and Long Island University in Brooklyn, NY.

Randy D. Danielsen, PhD, DFAAPA, PA-C Emeritus
Randy D. Danielsen, PhD, DFAAPA, PA-C Emeritus
Dean
Read Bio
+
Grey LinkedIn logo

Dr. Danielsen is Dean of the Arizona School of Health Sciences. Since graduating from the University of Utah Physician Assistant (PA) Program in 1974, Dr. Danielsen has distinguished himself as a clinician, PA educator, author, and editor. He received his BS in Health Science (cum laude) from the University of Utah in 1978, his Masters in PA Studies (MPAS) from the University of Nebraska with an emphasis on Internal Medicine in 1997, and his PhD from the Union Institute & University in 2003 with an emphasis on Medical Education. He completed sixteen years with A.T. Still University as academic coordinator (1995-1997), chair of physician assistant studies (1997-2004), and as dean of the Arizona School of Health Sciences (2004-2010) and recently returned as Dean of ASHS. He was honored in 2010 by A.T. Still University with Emeritus Professor status. He has served on the board of directors of the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) and as a board member and chairman for National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants.

Earlier in his career, Dr. Danielsen served as president of the Utah Academy of Physician Assistants, the Arizona State Association of PAs, and as chair of the Arizona Regulatory Board for PAs. Retired after 28 years of service in the US Air Force and Army National Guard with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, Dr. Danielsen also is a former president of the Veterans Caucus of the AAPA and was honored with the Caucus’ Civilian PA of the Year Award in 2003.

Dr. Danielsen was named Outstanding PA of the Year by the AAPA in 1993 and by the Arizona State Association of Physician Assistants in 2011. He currently serves as PA editor-in-chief for Clinician Review. Dr. Danielsen has published over sixteen peer-reviewed articles, eighteen journal editorials, two book chapters, and most recently his first book, entitled The Preceptor’s Handbook for Supervising Physician Assistants, published by Jones & Bartlett Learning. Recently he was selected as a Senior Consultant with the Academy for Academic Leadership.

Amanda Vigil, MBA
Amanda Vigil, MBA

Read Bio
+
Grey LinkedIn logo

​Amanda Vigil, MBA, is the administrative manager for the Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences. Ms. Vigil received both her bachelor of science in business management and master’s of business administration from the University of Phoenix in Arizona. As the administrative manager, she oversees the administrative staff within her department and also manages the daily functions of the athletic training masters program (residential), Doctor of Athletic Training program (online) and the other units within the department. Ms. Vigil is involved in various groups within A.T. Still University and the Arizona School of Health Sciences (ASHS). She is currently an active member of the University Staff Council representing ASHS, sits on the ASHS Staff Assembly and the ASHS Shared Leadership Committee. Mrs. Vigil brings over fifteen years of management and administrative experience with her and is also responsible for various human resource activities, departmental special projects and reports directly to Dr. Sauers.

Kaylynn Schmitt
Kaylynn Schmitt

Read Bio
+

Kaylynn Schmitt is the administrative assistant for the Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences. Ms. Schmitt brings over 5 years of administrative and clerical experience to our program. She assists the program director, faculty and administrative manager with the administration responsibilities for both the Doctors in Athletic Training and Masters in Athletic Training programs.

University Catalog

University Catalog Program guideRead the University Catalog to learn more about the Doctor of Athletic Training online program and university.

Visit About Us to learn more about ATSU.

Accreditation

A.T. Still University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission

230 S. LaSalle Street; Suite 7-500
Chicago, IL 60604

Phone: 800.621.7440 | Fax: 312.263.7462
Email: info@hlcommission.org

ncahlc.org


Degree-granting authority for the Arizona School of Health Sciences has been given by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, 1400 West Washington Rd., Room 260, Phoenix, AZ 85007. Phone 602.542.5709.

Educational Pathways and Professional Opportunities

With so many educational options and different opportunities within athletic training curricula, the first step is matching your desired professional outcomes to the right educational tracks.

Click on the graphic below to start exploring your possible educational pathways and professional opportunities.

Why Graduate Certificates in AT?

Do you want to focus on your passion points and areas of interest? Then, our AT graduate certificate programs offer a way to do just that. If you want a terminal degree, then use these to build a clinically-focused athletic training doctoral degree.

READ MORE

PhD vs. Doctorate in Athletic Training?

Do you love doing lab research or want a generic terminal degree? Or, do you want a clinically-focused terminal AT degree with an emphasis on teaching the next generation of practitioners, conducting research in the field, or becoming the AT expert at the point of care?

READ MORE

Doctor of Athletic Training Administration and Faculty

Sports medicine leadership and expertise is demonstrated throughout the program, including by ATSU’s faculty and staff. Renowned faculty are recognized experts with national influence who share emerging trends and opportunities in athletic training practice and education. Interaction with a variety of instructors offers students exposure to a variety of teaching styles, healthcare- and education-related backgrounds and experiences that contribute to a well-rounded education fostering personal and professional growth.
Eric Sauers, PhD, ATC, FNATA
Professor & Department Chair Interdisciplinary Health Sciences
Tamara McLeod, PhD, ATC, FNATA
Professor & Director Athletic Training Programs
Sue Falsone, PT, MS, SCS, ATC, L-AT, CSCS, COMT, RYT
Associate Professor Athletic Training Programs
Andy Winterstein, PhD, ATC
Adjunct Professor Athletic Training Programs
Randy Danielsen, PhD, PA, DFAAPA
Dean, ATSU-ASHS
Ann Lee Burch, PT, MPH, EdD
Vice Dean, ATSU-ASHS
Craig Phelps, DO, FAOASM
President, ATSU
Clinton Normore, MBA
Associate Vice President for Diversity & Inclusion
Load More Videos +

Doctor of Athletic Training Research

The Athletic Training program seeks to foster the value of scholarly activity and to develop students’ leadership skills in the research aspects of athletic training. The multidisciplinary setting at ATSU-ASHS, which includes physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistant studies, and audiology, promotes cross-disciplinary scholarship and provides students with exposure to a variety of different research programs.
  • Research Equipment and Facilities +

    • The Interdisciplinary Research Laboratory is a 3,000 square-foot facility with an expanded offering of research equipment and opportunities to study neuromuscular, metabolic, and cognitive function.

      The Interdisciplinary Research Laboratory houses and supports equipment to study neuromuscular and cognitive function, including:

      • 12-camera Vicon™ Motion Analysis System with Motion Monitor™ software and high-performance computer to capture kinematic data
      • EMG unit, the Noraxon Wireless TeleMyo DTS 16-channel system, for assessment of neuromuscular performance characteristics
      • In-floor Kistler 9286 AA Slimline Force Plate, a portable multi-component force plate for measuring ground reaction forces and moments acting in any direction
      • GaitRite gait analysis system
      • NeuroCom Smart Balance Master with a long forceplate and the Dynavision system, for measuring postural stability and vestibular function
      • RealEyes™ binocular XDVR video goggles and camera for assessing and recording eye movements
      • LigMaster computerized stress device, available for assessment of ankle, knee, elbow, and glenohumeral joint force-displacement characteristics
      • MiniSim™ driving simulator system with Logitech™ G27 steering wheel/pedals/shifter and instrument button boxes for control of equipment (i.e., wipers, light, mirrors) that interfaces with a high-performance computer with high speed graphics card and three 24” monitors with software for MiniSim™ driving simulator system
      • 2 GE LOGIQ e diagnostic ultrasound units
      • 4 desktop and laptop computers dedicated to data analysis and writing
      • Custom made joint stiffness device
      • Electrogoniometers, accelerometers, and hand-held dynamometers

      The Interdisciplinary Research Laboratory also houses and supports equipment to study exercise and metabolic function, including:

      • Parvo metabolic system with ECG
      • CosMed portable metabolic system
      • Treadmill
      • Lode electronically braked adult and pediatric cycle ergometers
      • Monark cycle ergometer

      ATSU’s Mesa Campus Learning Resource Center (LRC) supports the teaching and eventual practice of students and the teaching and research of its faculty. The LRC takes advantage of electronically based information resources that have developed since the emergence of the Internet a decade ago to facilitate and support access and use evidence in support of all instruction, research, and services at the University. The LRC’s collections are a blending of print and electronic resources to bring information access into the curriculum and clinical rotations of the students.

      Access to and use of the LRC’s electronic resources is facilitated through its website (on the ATSU Intranet) and its online portal (http://atsu.azhin.org). The web site provides access to the LRC’s print holding, information on services provided and copies of LRC service request forms. The portal provides access to, and facilitates use of, more than 1,000 clinically oriented electronic, full text journals, more than120 full text medical textbooks, and an array of web-based, health information-based vendors. Via the LRC’s membership in the National Network of Medical Libraries’ Docline interlibrary loan system and OCLC’s interlibrary loan system, it can rapidly borrow books and articles from more than 20,000 libraries worldwide. More than 75 percent of the articles obtained from other libraries are received digitally within three days.

  • Doctor of Athletic Training Applied Research +

    • The goal of the Applied Research Project (ARP) is to advance practical knowledge in athletic training based on applied research and analysis. Students will identify a project of interest that is applicable to their work setting and learn the process of identifying a problem, researching solutions, implementing change, and measuring outcomes. The ARP may not always result in a publishable manuscript, but should provide the student with an understanding of the quality improvement and/or research process.

      Students in the DAT have three primary options to complete their ARP requirements, the quality improvement option, case study option, or the original research option. Each option will follow the progression of the four ARP courses and culminate in an ARP presentation and written paper.

  • Faculty Research Interests +

    • Dr. Anderson’s primary research interests are focused on assessment of fundamental movement patterns and application of corrective exercise in orthopaedic rehabilitation. He has expertise in use of the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and Selective Functional Movement Assessment (SFMA) and is currently involved in research looking at the use of the FMS in injury risk prediction and corrective exercise interventions. In addition, he also has research interests in post-professional clinical education. Dr. Anderson is actively engaged in the continued development and maintenance of the CORE-AT Electronic Medical Record and has interests in its application in clinical education.

      Dr. Welch Bacon has methodological expertise in survey and qualitative research design. Her research interests include athletic training educational outcomes, with a specific focus on the incorporation of healthcare competencies within athletic training education, identifying effective educational techniques to aid athletic trainers in learning the fundamentals of evidence-based practice, competency-based education, and knowledge translation models.

      Ms. Falsone’s research interests include the effects of dry needling on orthopedic rehab and sport performance as well as cupping and its effects on blood flow, tissue decompression and stiffness. She is also interested in breathing assessment and interventions and upper extremity rehabilitation and sport performance techniques.

      Dr. Lam’s current line of research seeks to understand the overall impact of sport-related lower extremity injuries on patient-oriented outcomes. Specifically, Dr. Lam is interested in identifying the immediate and long-term impact of ankle and knee injuries on patient outcomes such as self-report of function and health-related quality of life. Through his research, he hopes to gain a better understanding of the patient’s perspective with the aim of improving patient outcomes and quality of care following a sport-related injury. To that end, Dr. Lam’s research interests also include identifying new methodologies to support comparative effectiveness research in sports medicine including the use of practice-based research networks, point-of-care clinical trials, Bayesian statistics, and healthcare information technology (eg, electronic medical records, big data, mobile devices).

      Dr. McLeod’s ongoing line of research revolves around sports medicine concerns of the pediatric athlete, with special emphasis on sport-related concussion. Dr. McLeod completed her dissertation on the use of clinical assessment tools for concussion in youth sports athletes. She has also looked at factors affecting the use of clinical concussion assessments such as practice effects and exertion and sat on the NATA Pronouncements Committee on the Management of Sports Related Concussions. Her current work is investigating the short- and long-term effects of pediatric sports concussion as well as recovery following concussion on traditional concussion measures and health-related quality of life and concussion awareness and education among various healthcare providers and school personnel. Dr. McLeod also has research interests regarding appropriate medical care for secondary school and collegiate athletics.

      Dr. Sauers’ primary research interests are related to examination and rehabilitation of the athletic shoulder with specific interests in shoulder outcomes assessment, the effectiveness of interventions for treating shoulder impairment, and shoulder mobility assessment. Dr. Sauers is also interested in the study of shoulder kinematics with research aimed at quantifying normal and pathologic laxity and stiffness of the glenohumeral joint and evaluating the relationship between micro-instability, scapular dyskinesis, and posterior capsular tightness in the overhead-throwing athlete. Dr. Sauers is also interested in studying issues related to athletic training education in the context of health professions education and issues related to post-professional education, including specialty certification and residency education in healthcare.

      Dr. Valier’s research focuses on clinical outcomes assessment, with an emphasis on the evaluation of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Her primary area of interest is in evaluating the HRQOL of high school and college athletes who suffer sport-related injury. She has investigated HRQOL in adolescent athletes in both the secondary school setting as well as in outpatient orthopaedic clinics. Dr. Valier is also interested in the use and development of patient-reported outcomes instruments for the purpose of outcomes assessment and measuring the end result of healthcare services. Her interests also include the measurement properties and interpretation of patient-reported outcome measures, with special attention towards meaningful change values (eg, minimal clinically important difference and minimal detectible change) and instrument interpretation. In addition to her concentration in clinical outcomes assessment, Dr. Valier’s research interests include epidemiology and better understanding risks and rates of sport-related injury as well as healthcare quality improvement methodologies for optimizing athletic training systems of care.

Additional Programs and Resources

Athletic Training Practice Based Research Network

Headquartered at A.T. Still University in Mesa, AZ, the Athletic Training Practice-Based Research Network (AT-PBRN) is an affiliate network of the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ) and is the first and only practice-based research network in athletic training. The mission of the AT-PBRN is to improve the quality of care and patient outcomes for patients under the care of athletic trainers. Personnel consist of 8 athletic training researchers, a bio-statistician, a post-doctoral research fellow, and a research coordinator. In addition, the AT-PBRN houses an external advisory board, which consists of a panel of fellow athletic trainers from across the country.

READ MORE
LEARN MORE
ATSU Concussion Program

A.T. Still University's Concussion Program serves as a resource for sport-related concussion education, research, and service for young athletes, parents, coaches, and administrators. Outreach services provided to athletes in Arizona include education, baseline (pre-season) testing and post-injury concussion evaluation. The program also provides training and education about concussions to athletes, coaches, parents, athletic trainers, athletic training students and other healthcare providers. Additionally, ATSU's Concussion Program is engaged in numerous research projects focusing on concussion awareness, assessment tools and interventions to enhance recovery.

READ MORE
LEARN MORE
CORE-AT Electronic Medical Record (EMR)

Students in A.T. Still University’s athletic training programs utilize the industry-leading CORE-AT electronic medical record (EMR) system, a web-based injury surveillance and EMR system for use by athletic trainers. The CORE-AT EMR was designed and developed by athletic trainers in partnership with ESSENTIALTALK, an international technology communication company, and is compliant with the data acquisition, storage, and transmission standards set forth by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Health information obtained using the CORE-AT system is not stored locally on computers. Instead, data is uploaded in real time and transmitted to secure, redundant servers.

READ MORE
LEARN MORE
Athletic Training Continuing Education

A.T. Still University is recognized by the Board of Certification, Inc. to offer continuing education for certified athletic trainers. The Athletic Training Practiced Based Research Network (AT-PBRN) is an ongoing source for clinical outcomes and evidence-base practice (EBP) education to educate and train post professional athletic training students. Free evidence-base practice category CEUs include: Incorporating EBP into Athletic Training: Overview of Practice-Based Partnerships (.75 - EBP CEU) Health Information Technology in Athletic Training (1.25 EBP CEUs) Coming Soon... Evidence-Based Practice in Athletic Training (3 EBP CEUs)

READ MORE
LEARN MORE

APPLY NOW

Pathway through green grass leading into a golden sunset.

Let your light shine at A.T. Still University. Combining leading-edge whole person healthcare with a commitment to serving those communities where needs are greatest, we provide students the opportunity to truly excel as doctors, dentists, healthcare providers and healthcare leaders. Apply now; click here.

LinkedIn

DAT LinkedIn

Stay up-to-date with the latest from our community of forward-thinking Athletic Trainers on LinkedIn.