Skip to content
Downward facing arrows enclosed in a circle, accompanied by the text "learn more"

Occupational Therapy Doctorate - Entry Level

Occupational Therapy Doctorate - Entry Level

Occupational Therapy Doctorate - Entry Level

A.T. Still University’s (ATSU) Entry-Level Doctor of Occupational Therapy program is a 36-month, full-time residential program. Graduates of this program will be prepared to practice in traditional settings as well as trained for innovative and visionary practice to meet society’s occupational needs. They will be equipped to not only work with individuals, groups and populations but will be prepared for leadership, activism and advocacy with program development as a focus area of study.

Offered through ATSU’s Arizona School of Health Sciences (ATSU-ASHS) on the Mesa, Arizona campus, students will be trained by expert faculty who will model the professional behaviors, attitudes and skills needed to provide client-centered services, build community partnerships, and collaborate on interprofessional teams. Students will be trained in occupation-based, theory-driven and evidence-informed practice. In support of the ATSU mission, the program will prepare students to embody social responsibility and develop knowledge and skills to address occupational and health inequities in society.

Students and faculty will work together in communities of learning to critically evaluate, analyze, interpret and apply information. This systematic and scientific process will be utilized throughout the curriculum and will be guide the doctoral experiential component of the program. The doctoral experience will involve building relationships and collaborating with community agencies and their clients to develop occupation-based programs that address the needs of service recipients.

Read More

In addition to required fieldwork experiences distributed throughout the program, Entry-Level Doctor of Occupational Therapy students will have early opportunities to engage in community work in preparation for their doctoral experience. This early exposure will not only prepare students to effectively engage in collaboration with community agencies and develop proficiency in cross-cultural interactions, but will enhance their understanding of social issues that contribute to occupational and health inequities.

Following graduation, students are eligible to sit for the OT certification examination developed by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). Upon passing the NBCOT exam, Entry-Level Doctor of Occupational Therapy graduates are then eligible to apply for state licensure in their state of residence. All states within the United States require licensure in order to practice occupational therapy.

The Entry-Level Doctor of Occupational Therapy program provides graduates with the knowledge and skills to function and practice beyond what is required for entry-level practice. Practitioners will be equipped to meet the evolving needs of dynamic systems and an increasingly diverse society.

Close

Video camera icon Related Videos

  • Entry-Level Doctor of Occupational Therapy, ATSU | Brandi Buchanan, Director & Associate Professor
  • Accreditation +

    • A.T. Still University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission,

      230 S. LaSalle Street; Suite 7-500
      Chicago, IL 60604

      Phone: 800.621.7440
      Fax: 312.263.7492

      Email: info@hlcommission.org

      ncahlc.org

      The Entry-Level Doctor of Occupational Therapy program has been approved by the Arizona State Board for Private Post-Secondary Education.

      The Entry-Level Doctor of Occupational Therapy program at ATSU has applied for accreditation and has been granted Candidacy Status by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449. ACOTE’s telephone number c/o AOTA is (301) 652-AOTA and its Web address is www.acoteonline.org.

      The program must have a preaccreditation review, complete an on-site evaluation, and be granted Accreditation Status before its graduates will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapist administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). Upon passing the NBCOT exam, Entry-Level Doctor of Occupational Therapy graduates are then eligible to apply for state licensure in their state of residence. All states within the United States require licensure in order to practice occupational therapy. Note that a felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure. Prospective applicant letter

Occupational Therapy Doctorate - Entry Level Degree Faculty

  • Dean +

      • Randy D. Danielsen, PhD, PA-C, DFAAPA Randy D. Danielsen, PhD, PA-C, DFAAPA
        Grey LinkedIn logo

        Dr. Danielsen is dean of the Arizona School of Health Sciences. Since graduating from the University of Utah Physician Assistant (PA) Program in 1974, Dr. Danielsen has distinguished himself as a clinician, PA educator, author, and editor. He received his BS in Health Science (cum laude) from the University of Utah in 1978, his Masters in PA Studies (MPAS) from the University of Nebraska with an emphasis on Internal Medicine in 1997, and his PhD from the Union Institute & University in 2003 with an emphasis on Medical Education. He completed sixteen years with A.T. Still University as academic coordinator (1995-1997), chair of physician assistant studies (1997-2004), and as dean of the Arizona School of Health Sciences (2004-2010) and recently returned as Dean of ASHS. He was honored in 2010 by A.T. Still University with Emeritus Professor status. He has served on the board of directors of the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) and as a board member and chairman for National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants.

        Earlier in his career, Dr. Danielsen served as president of the Utah Academy of Physician Assistants, the Arizona State Association of PAs, and as chair of the Arizona Regulatory Board for PAs. Retired after 28 years of service in the US Air Force and Army National Guard with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, Dr. Danielsen also is a former president of the Veterans Caucus of the AAPA and was honored with the Caucus’ Civilian PA of the Year Award in 2003.

        Dr. Danielsen was named Outstanding PA of the Year by the AAPA in 1993 and by the Arizona State Association of Physician Assistants in 2011. He currently serves as PA editor-in-chief for Clinician Review. Dr. Danielsen has published over sixteen peer-reviewed articles, eighteen journal editorials, two book chapters, and most recently his first book, entitled The Preceptor’s Handbook for Supervising Physician Assistants, published by Jones & Bartlett Learning. Recently he was selected as a Senior Consultant with the Academy for Academic Leadership.

  • Vice Dean +

      • Annlee Burch, PT, MPH, EdD Annlee Burch, PT, MPH, EdD
        Grey LinkedIn logo

        Dr. Burch is Vice Dean of the Arizona School of Health Sciences. Her primary responsibility is to serve as Chief Operating Officer of the School under the direction of the Dean. In addition, she leads several University or School wide initiatives including the Diversity Initiative Task Force and the ASHS Adelante Project. In her role, Dr. Burch represents the School in the Dean’s absence.

        Dr. Burch received her Doctor of Education (EdD) from Columbia University, Teachers College in 2005. She received her Masters of Public Health (MPH) from Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health in 2002 and her Masters of Physical Therapy (MS) from Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1989. She was a postdoctoral fellow with the Research Group on Health Disparities at Teachers College, Columbia University.

        Dr. Burch received her BA in Psychology from the University of Rochester. Prior to her appointment as Vice Dean, Dr. Burch served as the Chair of Physical Therapy from 2008-January 2012. Prior to coming to ATSU, Dr. Burch was the Director of Physical Therapy at the University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus in San Juan, Puerto Rico. She has held administrative and/or faculty positions at the International Center for the Disabled in NY, NY, Mercy College in NY, and Long Island University in Brooklyn, NY.

  • Chair and Program Director +

      • spacer image for page layout Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

        Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA is the chair of the occupational therapy (OT) department. Dr. Gupta has extensive experience in higher education, and nearly 20 years experience in OT education. She has held national elected positions at the American Occupational Therapy Association, most recently as the chair of the Commission on Education. She is also the elected chair of the Executive Board for the Society of Study of Occupation :USA.

        Dr. Gupta’s scholarship explores contextual influences on occupational engagement and participation​. She collaborates with underrepresented groups to understand the challenges in their context to access and opportunities for experiencing occupational potential, well-being and social inclusion. As an educator she is committed to helping students realize their social responsibility in building communities with optimal living conditions that promote health development and enhanced well-being across the lifespan for all members of our society.

  • Faculty +

      • Rachel Diamant, PhD, OTR/L, BCP Rachel Diamant, PhD, OTR/L, BCP
        Professor
        Read Bio Grey LinkedIn logo
      • Brandi Buchanan, OTD, OTR/L Brandi Buchanan, OTD, OTR/L
        Associate Professor
        Read Bio
      • Mary Zewicki Greer, PhD, OTR/L Mary Zewicki Greer, PhD, OTR/L
        Assistant Professor, Clinical Education Coordinator
        Read Bio
      • Mary Voytek, OTD, MC, OTR/L Mary Voytek, OTD, MC, OTR/L
        Assistant Professor
        Read Bio
  • Staff +

      • Leslie Hicks, BA Leslie Hicks, BA
        Program Manager

Occupational Therapy Doctorate - Entry Level Degree Admissions

  • Requirements +

    • Application Checklist

      1. Candidates accepted for admission will have earned a baccalaureate degree prior to matriculation.
      2. Applicants must have achieved a minimum 3.0 cumulative, as well science, GPA.
      3. Applicants are required to submit all official college or academic transcripts
      4. Applicants are required to obtain a minimum of 30 contact/observation hours in the occupational therapy field. More than one setting is recommended.
      5. Applicants must secure three (3) letters of reference. One of these letters must be written by: a present or former faculty member, academic advisor, or employer. One reference letter should come from a professional from the occupational therapy field or another clinical supervisor. The final letter can come from a reference of your choice, but may not be from a friend or family member. Letters from an educational consulting service will not be accepted. New letters of reference must be submitted for each application year.
      6. Applicants who are considered potential candidates will be invited to participate in an applicant interview process.
      7. Applicants must complete all prerequisite courses by the end of the semester prior to matriculation (Spring).
      8. Applicants are expected to be computer literate and experienced in word processing. All curricula require extensive computer usage. Accepted applicants are required to have a laptop computer prior to the first day of class.
      9. Students must obtain and maintain CPR certification. Verification must be submitted to ATSU-ASHS prior to enrollment.
      10. Applicants are required to submit to a criminal background check at their own expense.
      11. Applicants need to be aware that having a felony conviction might impact a graduate’s future ability to sit for the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy Exam and/or ability to obtain state licensure to practice.
      12. All students are required to demonstrate proficiency in English when applying to ATSU-ASHS. You can find information on the methods by which you can demonstrate your English Proficiency in the General Admissions section.
      13. Applicants who wish to be considered for more than one ATSU-ASHS program (i.e. Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, Audiology) must submit a separate application and fee, transcripts and references. Acceptance to ATSU-ASHS is to a specific program and is not transferable to any other program. Application materials are not transferable from one application year to another.
      14. Applications for the Doctor of Occupational Therapy - Entry Level program are processed on a rolling admissions basis, but applicants are encouraged to apply early. Point of entry into the program is only once each academic year with classes beginning in mid-July.

      International Students

      The following guidelines will be followed in reviewing international students for admission to ATSU-ASHS.

      1. International students applying for admission to ATSU-ASHS must meet all general requirements for admission as stated in admissions publications.
      2. Applicants must provide proof of permanent U.S. residency status or qualify as an international applicant. International applicants must possess a student visa issued by the United States government and provide proof of English proficiency. International student visa status must be valid for the duration of the respective curriculum.
      3. All students are required to demonstrate proficiency in English when applying to ATSU-ASHS. Written and spoken proficiency in the English language may be demonstrated by one of the following options:
        • Option 1 - English is your first language.
        • Option 2 - Graduated from a regionally accredited four year university or college in the United States (minimum B.A. or B.S.)
        • Option 3 -
          • You are demonstrating your English proficiency by submitting acceptable scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Testing Service (IELTS).
          • Acceptable TOEFL minimum scores for ASHS applications are: Internet based total score = 80
          • Acceptable IELTS scores are an overall band score of 6.5
          • *Please note. TOEFL subscore minimums may be required by some programs. Please refer to the individual program website or catalog page to determine if subscores are required. The TOEFL is administered by TOEFL/TSE Services, PO Box 6151, Princeton, NJ, 08541-6151, USA (609) 771-7100. For more information: www.toefl.org. A.T Still University’s institutional code is 0339. Please be sure to include this information when you submit your application packet. “TOEFL Educational Testing Services P.O. Box 6151 Princeton, NJ 08541-6151 (609) 771-7100”

      4. Applicants who have graduated from a foreign college or university must submit acceptable evidence of U.S. degree/course equivalency. All course work taken at the foreign institution must be evaluated for American institution equivalence by one of the following services:

        Approved evaluation institutions:
        World Education Services P.O. Box 5087 Bowling Green Station New York, NY 10274-5087 p: 212.966.6311 f: (212) 739.6139 info@wes.org www.wes.org Josef Silny & Associates, Inc. International Education Consultants 7101 SW 102 Avenue Miami FL 33173 p: 305.273.1616 f: 305.273.1338 info@jsilny.com www.jsilny.com
        Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc. P.O. Box 514070 Milwaukee, WI 53203-3470 414.289.3400 Intl. Education Research Foundation, Inc. PO Box 3665 Culver City, CA 90231-3665 310.258.9451 www.ierf.org
        American Assn. of Collegiate Registrars & Admissions Officers One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 520 Washington, DC 20036-1135 202.293-9161 www.aacrao.org

      5. Credit for advanced standing will not be given for any work completed in foreign graduate or medical schools. All students must apply for first year status.
      6. International students must have permanent residency status (green card) to be eligible to receive any type of financial assistance through the college loan programs.
  • Application +

    • Applicants will apply online via the Occupational Therapy Centralized Application Service (OTCAS). Applications for the Occupational Therapy Doctorate - Entry Level program are processed on a rolling admissions basis with the final application deadline of April 1 of the entry year. Applicants are encouraged to apply early; applications can be submitted to OTCAS beginning in July, but will begin to be reviewed by ATSU-ASHS Admissions in September, for each application cycle. Although all applications are considered until class openings are filled, please be advised that applications are not considered complete nor reviewed until all admissions materials are received by ATSU Admissions. Point of entry into the program is only once each academic year with classes beginning in mid-July.

      For additional information contact an Enrollment Counselor:
      480.219.6000 or inquiry@atsu.edu

  • Tuition+

    • Tuition rates for 2016-17.

      Year 1 Year 2 Year 3
      $29,886 $29,886 $29,886

      Secondary application fee is $60. Pre-registration fee is $250. Educational supply fee is $1,050.

      All fees may be subject to change.

  • Request Information+

    • stethoscope

      Have a question for ATSU?

      Connect with ATSU regarding any question you may have regarding our schools or curriculum and a representative will respond to you quickly.

      For additional information contact the Entry-Level Doctor of Occupational Therapy program manager at 480.265.8086:or lhicks@atsu.edu

      ARIZONA CAMPUS

      5850 E. Still Circle
      Mesa, AZ 85206
      Phone: 480-219-6000

  • Frequently Asked Questions+

    • 1. What is the difference between an entry-level master’s degree and the Occupational Therapy Doctorate -Entry Level degree at ATSU?
      The occupational therapy profession has two options for entry-level practice - a master’s degree or a clinical doctorate degree (OTD). While both the degrees prepare graduates for taking their certification exam required for entry-level practice, the OTD-E additionally prepares graduates for a focused area of study beyond the entry-level. In our program the choices are in innovative practice, skills for program development, advanced leadership, activism and advocacy.

      2. How does the OTD-E curriculum differ from that of a master’s?
      There are some key aspects in the OTD-E curriculum that differentiates it from a master’s.

      • Students will work in groups to complete a directed research study and experience the complete research process.
      • The OTD-E curriculum has a unique 16-week doctoral experiential component, which is an in-depth experience in one or more of the following student-selected areas: advanced clinical practice, research, policy and advocacy, or education.
      • Students can choose an elective to enhance their understanding of a focused area of study.

      3. Does it take longer to complete the OTD-E degree compared to the master’s?
      The OTD-E is a 36-month, full-time residential program that has additional curriculum requirements compared to the master’s degree.

      4. Why would I want to do one extra year of study when both degrees are entry-level?
      The answer depends on your current life situation and your career goals. If you see yourself holding leadership roles, want to practice in non-traditional areas of practice, go into private practice, consult, etc. OTD-E will prepare you for these roles.

      5. If a student were to complete at least 28 months of the program but not all 36 would they be granted a master’s degree?

      At this time this is not an option for students who enroll in the OTD-E program.

      Other aspects of the OTD-E program include:

      • Full-time residential program, meaning faculty is in the classroom.
      • Student-centered teaching and accessible faculty.
      • Tuition credit cost is the same as a master’s, but overall the OTD-E program will cost more as there are additional course requirements to meet doctoral standards.
      • Focus in innovative practice to meet society’s occupational needs as well as prepare students for traditional areas of practice.
      • Students will work in the community to develop programs for diverse groups and populations.

The Family and Culture


Three medical students wearing white lab coats smiling, posed for a picture. Female medical students wearing white lab coats, smiling while consulting with a patient. Students gathered around a woman lying underneath an x-ray machine. Three medical professionals examining the ear of an elderly man. Physical Therapy students working together. A young woman wearing a white lab coat, talking with a small boy holding a teddy bear. Male medical professional examining a mouth mold. Physical therapy doctor examining the knee of a young woman. Group workshop featuring people seated in rows of chairs with their arms stretched out.

 

  • Blackboard Demo Course +

    • An iPad logging into ATSU's app with an open book displayed in the backgroundATSU has set up a demo course of our Blackboard
      Learning Management System for interested students.

      Please go to our guest demo site, and login with:

      Username: OTDEdemo
      Password: guest


      Connect Now

Entry-Level Doctor of Occupational Therapy Curriculum Overview

The Entry-Level Doctor of Occupational Therapy coursework explores models and skill sets needed for clinical and community practice in unique and emerging healthcare arenas with concurrent demonstration of knowledge and practice skills in traditional settings. The program helps students understand the importance of promoting health and wellbeing, quality of life, and prevention in a variety of practice areas. Specialized coursework coupled with experiential learning in the community ensures that graduates of the program possess the knowledge and skills needed to prepare them to function and practice beyond what is required for entry-level practice as an OT generalist.

*Course titles and descriptions subject to change.

  • Curriculum Plan Overview+

    • Year 1 - Fall

      Course Number Course Titles Credit Hours
      6110 Functional Human Anatomy 3
      6210 Foundations 1: Conceptual basis of Occupational Therapy 2
      6310 Groups: Theory and Process 2
      6410 Professional Development 1 1
      6320 Occupational Continuum across Health, Lifespan, & Context 3
      6610 Fieldwork I A (1 week) plus Break (1 week) 1
      6120 Pathophysiology & Conditions 3
      6420 Professional Development II 1
      6220 Foundations II: Occupational Basis of Practice 2
      Total Credits: 18
      Term Break

      Year 1 - Spring

      Course Number Course Titles Credit Hours
      6130 Neuroscience: Basis for Human Behavior 3
      6430 Professional Development III 1
      6230 Research Methods & Design 4
      Practice Immersion I 6
      6620 Fieldwork I B (1 week) plus Break (1 week) 1
      6140 Analysis of Human Motion 3
      Total Credits: 18
      6630 Fieldwork I C (1 week) & Summer Term Break (1 week)

      Year 2 - Fall

      Course Number Course Titles Credit Hours
      7210 Practice Immersion II 6
      7220 Practice Immersion III 6
      7120 Professional Development IV 2
      7710 Directed Research 1 2
      7310 Modalities 2
      Total Credits: 18

      Year 2 - Spring

      Course Number Course Titles Credit Hours
      7620 Fieldwork Level II (12 weeks) 8
      7410 Administration & Management 3
      7510 Leadership, Activism & Advocacy 3
      7610 Promoting Health & Wellbeing across the Continuum 2
      8810 Seminar 1 1
      7720 Directed Research II 1
      Total Credits: 18
      Term Break

      Year 3 - Fall

      Course Number Course Titles Credit Hours
      8820 Seminar II 3
      7730 Directed Research III 2
      7320 Elective: Focus area of Study 3-4
      7630 Fieldwork Level II (12 weeks) 8
      Total Credits: 17-18

      Year 3 - Spring

      Course Number Course Titles Credit Hours
      8910 Doctoral Experience (16 weeks) 10-12
      7740 Directed Research IV 4
      Total Credits: 14-16

      Year 3 - Summer

      Course Number Course Titles Credit Hours
      8830 Doctoral Experience (16 weeks) 4
      8730 Directed Research IV 1
      8920 Practice competency: Certification exam prep course 1
      Total Credits: 6
      Grand Total Credits 109-111
  • Functional Human Anatomy+

    • This course provides a comprehensive review of functional human anatomy needed to understand the body structures and body functions that are pre-requisites to performance of daily occupations. This course will be taught using a regional approach, to cover the anatomy of the head, neck, spine, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, lower extremity and upper extremity.

  • Foundations I: Conceptual Basis of Occupational Therapy +

    • This course examines the development of occupational therapy as a health profession. Occupational therapy will be investigated within its historical and cultural context, including philosophy and social movements, the political and economic influences, and the rise of American medicine, in particular the paradigm of rehabilitation. The course will illustrate how the areas and methods of occupational therapy training/education and practice have changed over time.

  • Professional Development I: OT and the Individual client+

    • This course will focus on bridging theoretical concepts and practice in working with individuals in their everyday contexts. Students will learn the basis of clinical reasoning in occupational therapy practice. Students will critically examine client-centered practice and ethical decision-making, cultural humility, and the therapeutic use of self in the creation of the reflective practitioner.

  • Groups: Theory and Process+

    • This course will assist students in developing an understanding of group process and the relationship of self to the group. Group dynamics as well as the phases of group development, group roles, conflict resolution, problem solving, and therapeutic groups are discussed. Students will be required to develop group protocols, lead groups, and process the outcomes. Additionally demonstration of giving and receiving feedback will be monitored.

  • Occupational Continuum across Health, Lifespan, & Context+

    • This course takes a health development and life course perspective to address occupational transitions and disruptions. The occupational therapy practice context will span from neonatal care, school, and work to aging-in-place and end of life and hospice care. Students will learn the impact of occupational loss and gains on health, well-being and quality of life. The fundamental role of context to access and opportunities for occupational engagement and occupational therapy services will be addressed.

  • Pathophysiology & Conditions+

    • This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of general pathology. The etiology, pathogenesis, and disease manifestation in body structures/body functions are discussed with emphasis on the signs and symptoms of disease and their subsequent impairments. Conditions typically seen by occupational therapists will be discussed, to form connections between impairment, activity limitations, occupational and performance issues. Medical management and treatment will be discussed.

  • Foundations II: Occupational Basis of Practice+

    • This course will introduce students to the fundamental aspects of occupational therapy practice- the therapeutic use of everyday occupation in health development, healing, recovery and enhancing quality of life. Historical and contemporary use of creative activities will be discussed, and students will experience first hand the ‘doing’ of creative activities to gain insight into the person factors (physical, affective and cognitive), and contextual demands of various tasks, activities and occupations. Students will also become proficient in occupational and activity analysis that is the unique core of occupational therapy.

  • Professional Development II: Promoting Population Health, Well-being and Participation +

    • This course is designed to stimulate critical thinking about occupation as a health determinant, and its relationship to well-being, participation, and social inclusion. The relevance of contextual factors and social determinants of health on occupational access and opportunities will be the central theme of this course. Concepts of social justice, occupational justice, and health justice will be the key constructs introduced in this course.

  • Research Methods and Design+

    • This course is designed to introduce students to research paradigms and methodologies that inform the science of human occupation and occupational therapy. A critical perspective of research methods and designs will be discussed for evaluating the literature for evidence-based practice. Quantitative, qualitative and mixed-method designs will be discussed.

  • Neuroscience: Foundations for Occupational Behavior+

    • This course introduces students to current science of the development, structure, and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems. A systems approach will be used to describe neuroscience as basis of human behavior, and implications of neurological dysfunction to performance of daily occupations will demonstrate relevance to practice. This course will adopt a case-based approach to analyze neurological conditions commonly encountered in rehabilitation.

  • Analysis of Human Movement+

    • This course will introduce students to scientific foundations of human movement. Students will understand theoretical concepts and principles of kinesiology and biomechanics as it relates to occupational performance. Relevant clinical conditions will be used to apply biomechanical concepts to disorder of movement in osteoarthritis, spinal cord injury, hip fracture, connective tissue injury, peripheral nerve injury, and work related musculoskeletal injury.

  • Practice Immersion 1: Behavioral Health/Psychosocial Approaches +

    • Occupational therapy practice for children, youth, adults and older adults, with psychiatric diagnosis, or psychosocial issues is the basis for this course. Students will learn to integrate evidence and frames of reference relevant to current and emerging practice areas. This course will provide the foundational knowledge and skills required for evaluation, intervention, and discharge planning for clients with mental health issues. Students will learn how to facilitate recovery, optimize occupational engagement, and improve well-being and the quality of life for persons with psychiatric conditions. This practice course will help students apply client-centered, evidence-based, and ethical decision-making with individuals experiencing mental health issues. Students will use case studies to apply concepts, discuss intervention approaches, design and deliver mental health and psychosocial occupational therapy services in a range of settings.

  • Professional Development III: Building Community Partnerships & the Needs Assessment Process +

    • This course will examine health and occupational inequities in society. This course continues the thread that connects the occupational therapy practitioner to the needs of the larger community and will focus on context-specific occupation-based programming. Services may be designed for the traditional practice environments, or in community organizations and diverse social service systems. Assessing the needs of a community and matching these needs to the interests and expertise of the practitioner will be the primary focus.

  • Fieldwork Level I+

    • Each Level I Fieldwork is a one-week full-time experience with a full-time OT Fieldwork educator, or other qualified personnel who understand the role of occupational therapy practitioners. The purpose of the fieldwork experience is for students to expose students to experiences so that they get comfortable working with clients in a variety of settings, and enhance their didactic learning through observation and participation in some aspects of the occupational therapy process.

      Relationship to the Curriculum Design: Promote Health and Wellness in All Practices; Encourage Social Consciousness and Responsibility
      In tandem with OT 723 this course, from the The Occupational Therapist as Scholar content block, will provide the understanding and the tools to critically evaluate quantitative research as it is used to both inform and to generate best practices of occupational therapy across all populations.

  • Professional Development IV: Program Design & Development+

    • To complete the ‘professional development’ series this course will provide the opportunity to link the needs assessment process and preliminary planning completed in OT 6530 to the development and implementation of community based programming. Students will be introduced to marketing procedures, program evaluation and outcome measurement, financial planning, and the fundamentals of grant identification and application. Community involvement toward sustainability will be emphasized from the process of needs assessment to program outcomes.

  • Fieldwork Level I+

    • Each Level I Fieldwork is a one-week full-time experience with a full-time OT Fieldwork educator, or other qualified personnel who understand the role of occupational therapy practitioners. The purpose of the fieldwork experience is for students to expose students to experiences so that they get comfortable working with clients in a variety of settings, and enhance their didactic learning through observation and participation in some aspects of the occupational therapy process.

  • Practice Immersion II: Children & Youth +

    • TThis course will introduce students to the occupational development and occupational needs of infants, toddlers, children and adolescents. Typical and atypical development will be discussed within the context of community, family and school environments. Students will explore occupational therapy process with children and youth, relevant theories, models and frames of reference, and learn evidence-based practice and clinical guidelines. The course will prepare students in all aspects of the occupational therapy process in a variety of pediatric settings with special attention to family-centered care and collaborations with other professionals. This practice course will help students with client-centered, evidence-based, and ethical decision-making with children and their families.

  • Practice Immersion III: Adults with Physical Disabilities +

    • This course will introduce students to the occupational therapy process for adults with physical dysfunction who experience difficulties with everyday occupations. Students will be prepared as generalists in physical rehabilitation for adults with different conditions, in a variety of current practice settings [e.g., hospital (acute, sub-acute), community (out patient, home and long-term care)] and service delivery models. Students will learn relevant evidence-supported theoretical perspectives, models and frames of references, evidence-based practice literature and clinical guidelines in physical rehabilitation. This practice course will help students with client-centered, evidence-based, and ethical decision-making with adults.

  • Modalities+

    • This course provides instruction on preparatory therapeutic interventions for occupational engagement. Course content will include the instruction, application and assessment of the use of physical agent modalities, splinting and taping techniques. Indications and contraindications will be discussed for each technique or modality presented. Reimbursement and documentation for use of modalities will be discussed.

  • Fieldwork Level I+

    • Each Level I Fieldwork is a one-week full-time experience with a full-time OT Fieldwork educator, or other qualified personnel who understand the role of occupational therapy practitioners. The purpose of the fieldwork experience is for students to expose students to experiences so that they get comfortable working with clients in a variety of settings, and enhance their didactic learning through observation and participation in some aspects of the occupational therapy process.

  • Seminar I: Introduction to Proposal Development+

    • In this doctoral experience preparatory course, students will prepare the proposal for their Doctoral Experience component. Students will utilize all previous didactic and experiential components of the program, specifically the Professional Development series. This is a student-driven project where students are expected to identify a target population and/or an agency or community partner that could benefit from an occupation-based programming in the community. Students will work with faculty advisors and community stake-holders, at all stages of the project - program development, implementation and evaluation.

  • Fieldwork Level II+

    • Each Level II Fieldwork is 12 weeks of full-time work under the supervision of a full-time OT Fieldwork educator.

  • Role in Promoting Health and Well-being+

    • This course will explore opportunities for OTs to influence the health and/or wellbeing of individuals and populations. Students will examine topics within public health and epidemiology and expand their knowledge of OT’s capacity to prevent disease, disability, and activity limitations and to promote health, participation, and social inclusion. ​

  • Leadership, Activism and Advocacy+

    • ​Leadership theories and their application in occupational therapy are explored. This course will explore avenues of leadership for novice occupational therapists. Students will learn advocacy skills needed to represent individual, community, and population-based concerns. Students will be exposed to activism strategies necessary to influence current policy/legislation and promote social change for underserved populations. At the end of the course students will demonstrate their ability to be a change agent in an area of interest.

  • Directed Research I+

    • This course is the first in the directed research series, and introduces students to the research process. Students will participate in faculty-led research projects and develop an understanding of the area of study and begin the literature review process. ​

  • Administration & Management +

    • This class focuses on the principles of organization and management in the health care system today. Administration and management in occupational therapy across practice settings with focus on an overview of payment systems, departmental organization, marketing, supervision, quality improvement and program evaluation. Models covered include nonprofit, proprietary, entrepreneurial, and corporate facilities. Systems of managed care and changes in health care delivery are examined.

  • Directed Research II+

    • This segment of the directed research series, students will focus on writing the final literature review, and understand the research study design and methods best suited to answer the research question.

  • Seminar II: Program Development and Evaluation+

    • Students will be exposed to different methods of conducting a needs assessment and how to use the information obtained from a needs assessment to plan for and develop a program for a specific targeted population. By the end of the course, students will be expected to complete a needs assessment and plan a program relevant to meeting an identified need at their practice site or with a community partner. During this seminar, students will also be introduced to and explore different methods of program evaluation and outcomes assessment. As part of the seminar, students may need to complete an IRB application to assess outcomes associated with a program they will develop.

  • Directed Research III+

    • In this phase of the directed research series, students will develop the research proposal and obtain IRB approval for conducting research. Data collection may commence at this stage pending approval from IRB.​

  • Elective: Focus Area of Study+

    • Students will enroll in an elective course that will contribute to expanding their understanding of a focused area of study and/or their Doctoral Experience. The student, with guidance from a faculty advisor, may select an applicable elective course from within the department, university (internal) or from outside of the university (external).

  • Fieldwork Level II +

    • Each Level II Fieldwork is 12 weeks of full-time work under the supervision of a full-time OT Fieldwork educator.

  • Directed Research IV+

    • In this penultimate course of the directed research series, students will focus on data analysis and interpretation of results of their faculty-led research study

  • Doctoral Experience+

    • Students will be actively engaged in the implementation of the project they have developed in collaboration with their community site. Students will work closely with staff and stakeholders at each site and will have ongoing support, as needed, from their faculty advisor

  • Directed Research V+

    • In this final course of the directed research series, students will develop the final product of the directed study, and prepare to disseminate it in a public forum.

  • Doctoral Experience+

    • The doctoral experiential component is an in-depth experience that prepares students beyond the entry-level (advanced), in one or more of the following: clinical practice skills, research skills, administration, leadership, program and policy development, advocacy, education, or theory development. Students will be work closely with assigned faculty advisor to implementation and evaluation of the project they have developed in collaboration with their community site, with oversight from faculty advisor. ​

  • Seminar III+

    • This seminar will include the public dissemination of the Doctoral experience capstone project and Directed research study. Formal presentations and/or posters that showcase the work and outcomes will be made to the campus community. Students will be required to prepare the final product, which is ready for submission in a peer-reviewed professional venue (ie., professional journal, state or national professional conference, etc.).

  • Practice Competency: Certification Exam Prep Course+

    • Students will attend a two-day course that will provide information, learning activities, practice questions and study strategies to use in preparation for taking the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy. This is a requirement to establish competency for entry-level practice.

Learn More

INNOVATING WHOLE PERSON HEALTHCARE

Man looking through an ophthalmoscope.

Community Health Center

Waianae, Hawaii

As a leading provider of quality healthcare for area residents, Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center also provides community employment and health education. More than 80% of the staff are local residents, and many were trained at the affiliated Waianae Health Academy. Find out more.

SPONSOR A CAUSE

Animated space view of the Earth with light rays illuminating out of the United States.

From public health centers located in communities where services are needed most, to research and other leading edge whole person healthcare initiatives, you can create your own legacy by contributing to the specific cause that moves you most. Find out more.

DONATE TO THE MISSION

Lit tea candle in the palm of a human hand.

When you give to A.T. Still University, you're not only supporting whole person healthcare education, you're also helping deliver it to where the care is needed most. Through our legacy program, we send students to underserved communities nationwide and conduct healthcare clinics at the university on occasion. Find out more.

WHOLE PERSON HEALTHCARE

Doctor playfully examining a young boy who is sitting on his mother's lap.

Whole person healthcare takes an integrated approach that addresses body, mind and spirit as one. Students are encouraged to participate in wellness programs and study areas including nutrition and psychology to gain a more comprehensive understanding. Find out more.

STAY CONNECTED

Large letter B on a black background with BE THE LIGHT text underneath.

Keep up with the latest developments in whole person healthcare at A.T. Still University with our complimentary newsletter and other publications. From scholarly inquiry and research to alumni activities and more. Sign up today.

APPLY NOW

Pathway through green grass leading into a golden sunset.

Let your light shine at A.T. Still University. Combining leading-edge whole person healthcare with a commitment to serving those communities where needs are greatest, we provide students the opportunity to truly excel as doctors, dentists, healthcare providers and healthcare leaders. Apply now; click here.