Clinical Decision-Making in Athletic Training

Clinical Decision-Making in Athletic Training

The Graduate Certificate in Clinical Decision-Making in Athletic Training is an online program providing advanced instruction in evidence-based practice, clinical outcomes assessments, clinical informatics and technology, and epidemiology.

The purpose of the program is to prepare practicing athletic trainers and athletic training educators with the clinical practice and educational competencies in clinical decision-making skills that will enhance the quality and effectiveness of patient care.

Why is the Graduate Certificate in Clinical Decision-Making in Athletic Training right for you?

  • The online course format is ideal for busy working professionals, and students are free to set the pace of program completion.
  • Certificates can be earned in as little as two quarters (20 weeks) or over a longer period of time to accommodate individual students needs.
  • Practicing clinicians will learn practical information to guide their clinical decision-making.
  • Athletic training educators will learn cutting-edge information required to teach clinical decision-making skills to their students and preceptors.
  • Courses completed in this 12-credit-hour program can be used to fulfill the Board of Certification (BOC) continuing education requirements by earning Level II – Category C: Post Certification College/University Coursework credit.
  • Completion of the certificate fulfills the Board of Certification requirements for Evidence-Based Practice CEUs.
  • Our accomplished faculty are national experts recognized for their contributions to advancing the practice and science of clinical decision-making in the AT profession.
  • Students will have the opportunity to network with faculty and colleagues dedicated to advancing AT education and patient care in the AT profession.
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Upon completion of the Athletic Training Graduate Certificate in Clinical Decision-Making, students will be able to:

  • Practice and/or teach athletic training in a manner that integrates clinical experience, patient values, and the best available evidence;
  • Employ and/or teach clinician-based and patient-based clinical outcome measures to determine the effectiveness of athletic training services;
  • Use and/or teach healthcare informatics and technology to communicate, manage knowledge, mitigate error, and support decision-making in athletic training practice; and
  • Implement quality improvement initiatives into athletic training practice
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Clinical Decision-Making in Athletic Training Faculty

  • Dean +

      • Randy D. Danielsen, PhD, PA-C, DFAAPA

        Randy D. Danielsen, PhD, PA-C, DFAAPA, is dean of A.T. Still University’s Arizona School of Health Sciences. Since graduating from the University of Utah Physician Assistant (PA) Program in 1974, Dr. Danielsen has distinguished himself as a clinician, PA educator, author, and editor. He received his BS in Health Science (cum laude) from the University of Utah in 1978, his Masters in PA Studies (MPAS) from the University of Nebraska with an emphasis on Internal Medicine in 1997, and his PhD from the Union Institute & University in 2003 with an emphasis on Medical Education. He completed sixteen years with A.T. Still University as academic coordinator (1995-1997), chair of physician assistant studies (1997-2004), and as dean of the Arizona School of Health Sciences (2004-2010) and recently returned as Dean of ASHS. He was honored in 2010 by A.T. Still University with Emeritus Professor status. He has served on the board of directors of the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) and as a board member and chairman for National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants.

        Earlier in his career, Dr. Danielsen served as president of the Utah Academy of Physician Assistants, the Arizona State Association of PAs, and as chair of the Arizona Regulatory Board for PAs. Retired after 28 years of service in the US Air Force and Army National Guard with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, Dr. Danielsen also is a former president of the Veterans Caucus of the AAPA and was honored with the Caucus’ Civilian PA of the Year Award in 2003.

        Dr. Danielsen was named Outstanding PA of the Year by the AAPA in 1993 and by the Arizona State Association of Physician Assistants in 2011. He currently serves as PA editor-in-chief for Clinician Review. Dr. Danielsen has published over sixteen peer-reviewed articles, eighteen journal editorials, two book chapters, and most recently his first book, entitled The Preceptor’s Handbook for Supervising Physician Assistants, published by Jones & Bartlett Learning. Recently he was selected as a Senior Consultant with the Academy for Academic Leadership.

  • Vice Dean +

      • Annlee Burch, PT, MPH, EdD

        Dr. Burch is vice dean of the Arizona School of Health Sciences. Her primary responsibility is to serve as chief operating officer of ATSU-ASHS under the direction of the dean. In addition, she leads several university or school wide initiatives including the Diversity Initiative Task Force and the ASHS Adelante Project. In her role, Dr. Burch represents the School in the Dean’s absence.

        Dr. Burch received her Doctor of Education (EdD) from Columbia University, Teachers College in 2005. She received her Masters of Public Health (MPH) from Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health in 2002 and her Masters of Physical Therapy (MS) from Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1989. She was a postdoctoral fellow with the Research Group on Health Disparities at Teachers College, Columbia University.

        Dr. Burch received her BA in Psychology from the University of Rochester. Prior to her appointment as Vice Dean, Dr. Burch served as the Chair of Physical Therapy from 2008-January 2012. Prior to coming to ATSU, Dr. Burch was the Director of Physical Therapy at the University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus in San Juan, Puerto Rico. She has held administrative and/or faculty positions at the International Center for the Disabled in NY, NY, Mercy College in NY, and Long Island University in Brooklyn, NY.

  • Chair +

      • Eric Sauers, PhD, ATC, CSCS

        Eric Sauers, PhD, ATC, CSCS, is a tenured full professor and chair of the Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences at the A. T. Still University (ATSU) Arizona School of Health Sciences (ASHS). Dr. Sauers received his bachelor’s degree in exercise science from Seattle Pacific University and his master of science degree in sports health care from ATSU. He completed his doctor of philosophy degree in sports medicine at Oregon State University (OSU).

        As the founding chair of the department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences, Dr. Sauers planned and implemented the online Human Movement program and the online Doctor of Health Sciences program, which he currently oversees, in addition to overseeing the Master of Science degree program in Athletic Training, the Human Anatomy Division, and the Biostatistics and Clinical Research Division. Dr. Sauers served as the Director of the Athletic Training Program from 2000 to 2009. His primary research interests are related to the assessment of clinical outcomes and health-related quality of life in athletes following musculoskeletal injury, the examination and rehabilitation of the athletic shoulder and post-professional athletic training education.

        Dr. Sauers has published numerous peer-reviewed scientific articles and given numerous state, regional, and national presentations related to his research. He is the President of the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists and Vice President of the Commission on the Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Dr. Sauers is the Associate Editor for Clinical Outcomes for the Journal of Sport Rehabilitation and an Editorial Board member for the Journal of Athletic Training and the Athletic Training Education Journal. Currently, he serves as the Chair of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) Post-Professional Education Committee and as a member of the NATA Education Council Executive Committee. Dr. Sauers received the President’s Award from the Arizona Athletic Trainers’ Association, the Distinguished Educator Award from the Rocky Mountain Athletic Trainers’ Association, and was recognized for his dedication to the athletic training profession with the distinction as a Fellow of the NATA.

  • Director +

      • Tamara McLeod, PhD, ATC, CSCS

        Tamara Valovich McLeod, PhD, ATC, CSCS ,is the John P. Wood, D.O., Endowed Chair for Sports Medicine, professor and director of the Athletic Training program at A.T. Still University in Mesa, Arizona. Dr. McLeod completed her doctor of philosophy degree in education with an emphasis in sports medicine from the University of Virginia. She is the director of the Athletic Training Practice-Based Research Network and her research has focused on the pediatric athlete with respect to sport-related concussion. Her current work is investigating the short- and long-term effects of pediatric sports concussion as well as recovery following concussion on traditional concussion assessments and health-related quality of life. Dr. McLeod also has research interests regarding gender differences in lower extremity function, specifically neuromuscular control, and postural stability and studies these areas through an injury prevention approach in younger athletes. Dr. McLeod was a contributing author for the NATA Position Statement on the Management of Sport-Related Concussion, the lead author on the NATA Position Statement on the Prevention of Pediatric Overuse Injuries, and a consultant and contributing author on the Appropriate Medical Coverage for Secondary School-Aged Athletes. Dr. McLeod serves on numerous editorial boards, and publishes frequently in the athletic training and sports medicine journals and is a NATA Fellow.

  • Faculty +

      • Tamara McLeod, PhD, ATC, CSCS
        John P. Wood, D.O., Endowed Chair for Sports Medicine and Professor
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      • Alison Valier , PhD, ATC
        Associate Professor and Director of Research Support
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      • Barton Anderson, MS, ATC, AT
        Assistant Professor and Clinical Education Coordinator
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      • Eric Sauers, PhD, ATC, FNATA
        Professor and Chair of the Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences
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      • Cailee Welch, PhD, ATC
        Assistant Professor
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      • Kellie C. Huxel Bliven, PhD, ATC
        Associate Professor
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      • Kenny Lam, ScD, ATC
        Assistant Professor
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      • R. Curtis Bay, PhD
        Associate Professor
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      • Chelsea Lohman, PhD, ATC, CSCS
        Assistant Professor
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      • John Parsons, PhD, ATC, AT
        Adjunct faculty
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      • Lori Michener, PhD, PT, ATC, SCS
        Adjunct faculty
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      • Gary D. Delforge, EdD
        Emeritus faculty
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  • Staff +

      • Amanda Vigil, MBA
        Administrative Manager

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      • Sarah Hubalik, BA
        Administrative Assistant

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Clinical Decision-Making in Athletic Training Admissions

  • Requirements +

    • The Graduate Certificate Program in Clinical Decision-Making in Athletic Training will admit athletic training professionals with diverse graduate education, work history, and life experiences who have demonstrated capacity to pursue a rigorous course of graduate study.
Prospective students are selected by considering the overall qualities of the applicant through application content, academic record, and prior experience.

      1. Candidates accepted for admission to the program will have earned a bachelor’s or higher degree prior to enrollment from a regionally accredited institution.
      2. Applicants to the Athletic Training program must demonstrate Board of Certification (BOC) certification as an athletic trainer.
      3. Candidates must have achieved a minimum 2.50 cumulative GPA (on a 4.0 scale) in their athletic training professional program or a minimum overall graduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale).
      4. Candidates are expected to be computer literate and experienced in word processing. All curricula require extensive computer usage. Accepted applicants are required to have a personal computer prior to matriculation and have access to a high-speed Internet connection.
      5. Candidates must submit an application form.
      6. Applicants must provide official transcripts from all educational institutions attended where a degree was conferred.
      7. All students are required to demonstrate proficiency in English when applying to A.T Still University’s Arizona School of Health Sciences.

  • Tuition and Financial Services+

    • Application fee: $70

      Tuition: $463.50 per credit hour (2013-2014 school year)

      Note: All fees and tuition are subject to change.

      Financial Services

      Federal financial assistance is not available for the Clinical Decision-Making in Athletic Training Certificate.

      ATSU refund policy for courses paid per credit hour

      Any student who withdraws from a class in the quarter (but does not exit the program) will be subject to the following refund policy. Extenuating circumstances may be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

      Students may withdraw from class at any time prior to or during the course. If a student drops a course before the quarter begins, they will receive a 100 percent tuition refund less a $60 administrative fee, and the dropped course will not reflect on the transcript. If the course is dropped on the:

      Student withdraws from a class: Refund policy:
      1st-3rd calendar day of the course 75% refund
      4th-6th calendar day of the course 50% refund
      7th-9th calendar day of the course 25% refund
      10th calendar day of the course or thereafter No refund and grade of “W”

      If a student fails to officially withdraw, an “F” will be given for the course. Withdrawals will be permitted after the fifth week of class only for extraordinary circumstances, on a student-by-student basis, and must be approved by the course director. A student’s non-participation does not constitute an official withdrawal from the course. If a withdrawal is approved, the transcript will reflect a grade of “W,” “WP,” or “WF” at the discretion of the course instructor. Students withdrawing from the course within the last 14 days of the end of the course will receive the grade earned at the time of withdrawal. If the student fails to officially withdraw, they will receive an “F” for the course.

The Family and Culture


 

  • Blackboard Demo Course +

    • ATSU has set up a demo course of our Blackboard
      Learning Management System for interested students.

      Please go to our guest demo site, and login with:

      Username: ATdemo
      Password: atsudemo


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Clinical Decision-Making in Athletic Training Curriculum Overview

The online course format is ideal for busy working professionals, and students are free to set the pace of program completion. We encourage you to bring your real world clinical and classroom examples into the program and apply the course content immediately to your clinical and/or educational practice. Students progress through course content in a sequential manner, and they will engage in discussions with peers and faculty and complete a variety of assignments to enhance their learning.

Certificates can be earned in as little as two quarters (24 weeks) or over a longer period of time to accommodate individual students needs.

  • ATRN 7110: Quality Improvement and Patient Safety+

    • This course is designed to enhance the athletic trainer’s understanding of quality improvement at the service and provider levels. The content covered will include patient safety, fundamentals of quality improvement, measuring improvement, cost and value models, and the history of quality improvement in healthcare.

      Course Objectives:

      • Discuss the process of quality improvement in healthcare
      • Identify patient safety issues that necessitate quality improvement
      • Discuss the fundamentals of improvement the provider and service levels
      • Evaluate quality, cost and value models of QI
      • Discuss the implementation of QI efforts in athletic training
  • ATRN 7120: Evidence-Based Practice +

    • This course is designed to enable the athletic trainer’s clinical decision-making process in a manner that integrates clinical experience, patient values, and the best available evidence. It is also intended to build on entry-level evidence-based practice courses with the use of informatics and technology to access the medical literature. The course will cover advanced topics related to the EBP process, framing clinical questions to enhance clinical decision-making, searching the literature, critical appraisal, integration and evaluation of the evidence, grading levels of evidence and strength of recommendations, patient values, and statistical terminology related to EBP.

      Course objectives:

      • Discuss the process of evidence-based practice in healthcare
      • Demonstrate the ability to use point-of-care applications to answer clinical questions
      • Demonstrate the ability to critically analyze published research studies
      • Discuss the integration of the best available evidence into clinical practice
      • Apply the process of evaluating the effectiveness of the best available evidence for individual patients in one’s clinical practice
      • Evaluate the levels of evidence or strength of recommendations of research articles
      • Appreciate patient values with respect to clinical decision-making
      • Select and apply effective information management tools in order to stay abreast of the proliferation of medical and health-related information.
      • Discuss the diagnostic accuracy of clinical tests and how it relates to evidence-based clinical practice.
      • Formulate appropriate research designs based on specific research questions
  • ATRN 7130: Patient-Oriented Outcomes+

    • Advanced Patient-Oriented Outcomes is designed to enhance the athletic trainer’s ability to employ clinician-based and patient-based clinical outcome measures for the determination of effective clinical decision-making through the practice of providing patient-centered whole person healthcare. Discussion of disablement models and outcomes research as the foundations to evidence-based practice will be provided. The use of disablement models as a framework for whole person healthcare and the evaluation of health-related quality of life will be presented. This course builds upon the basic components of clinical outcomes assessment by providing advanced content related to clinician- and patient-oriented outcomes. Instruction on the selection, implementation, and use of single- and multi-item, general and specific patient-rated outcomes instruments will be given. Details regarding the concepts of measurement properties, including assessment of measurement change, will be provided. Opportunity to develop an outcomes study through creation of a clinical question in PICO format will be provided and discussion of using practice-based research networks as means to conducting outcomes investigations will occur.

      Course objectives:

      • Select and integrate patient-rated outcome measures into patient care
      • Discuss the process of evaluating clinician-based and patient-based outcomes measures to address the effectiveness of athletic training services
      • Test and measure health-related quality of life which is defined as the physical, psychological, and social domains of health, seen as distinct areas that are influenced by a person’s experiences, beliefs, expectations, and perceptions, as the means to practicing whole person healthcare.
      • Demonstrate the ability to provide athletic training services with a patient-centered (respect for patients’ values, preferences, and expressed needs; coordination and integration of care; information, communication and education; physical comfort; emotional support; and involvement of family and friends), whole person approach
      • Define and evaluate the measurement properties of patient-rated outcomes instruments (e.g., reliability, validity, and responsiveness)
      • Value the concept of meaningful change (e.g., minimally clinically important difference) and its use in driving treatment decisions for the purpose of improved patient care
      • Design a clinical outcomes study for the purpose of improving the quality and outcomes of patient care
      • Value practice-based research as a mechanism to conduct large scale clinical outcomes studies aimed at improving the quality and outcomes of patient care
  • ATRN 7140: Health Information Technology+

    • The purpose of this course is to provide the athletic trainer with a survey of relevant concepts, tools, and systems of healthcare informatics and technology that may be useful throughout the clinical decision-making process. An understanding of informatics concepts and skills related to the use of technology has been identified as critical for all modern healthcare professionals. Moreover, informatics and technology provide several distinct advantages to the modern healthcare system, including, but limited to: cost savings, error detection, quality improvement, and improved patient outcomes.

      Course objectives:

      • Demonstrate the ability to use common technologies (e.g., electronic medical records, spreadsheet software, websites) to collect, evaluate, and disseminate clinical data and information as they relate to athletic training education, practice, research, and regulation
      • Discuss the role of healthcare informatics in quality improvement (e.g., an enhanced ability to identify errors and hazards in care, measure quality of care in terms of structure, process, and outcomes in relation to patient and community needs, and design and test interventions to change processes and systems of care, with the objective of improving quality)
      • Demonstrate ability to access, organize, and interpret data from available national databases (e.g., National Electronic Injury Surveillance System)
      • Compare and contrast the features and utility of popular electronic medical records for use in athletic training practice
      • Discuss the impact of the Internet on the availability of health information and the effect it will have on the clinician-patient relationship
      • Demonstrate the ability to interpret and apply guidelines and laws pertaining to the management, privacy, and confidentiality of health information in the practice of athletic training
      • Select and apply effective information management tools in order to stay abreast of the proliferation of medical and health-related information

Course Schedule

  • Academic Plan+

    • Students will be admitted into the graduate certificate program twice a year. The fall intake will allow students to start their curriculum with certificate courses offered in the University’s fall quarter (August to December). The spring intake will allow students to start their curriculum with certificate courses offered in the University’s spring quarter (March to June).

      Certificate courses are offered on the following schedule:

      Course No. Course Name Block Offered
      ATRN 7110 Quality Improvement and Patient Safety Fall Block 1 Spring Block 1
      ATRN 7120 Evidence-Based Practice Fall Block 1 Spring Block 1
      ATRN 7130 Patient-Oriented Outcomes Fall Block 2 Spring Block 2
      ATRN 7140 Health Information Technology Fall Block 2 Spring Block 2

      Student have the flexibility to choose how many classes they take per quarter, and the sequence with which they would like to progress through the curriculum.

      Example Academic Plan

      Example 1:

      Apply for admission for the fall block 1 intake, and take 2 classes per block.
      This could result in the following certificate plan:

      Fall Block 1:
      Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (ATRN 7110)
      Evidence-Based Practice (ATRN 7120)

      Fall Block 2:
      Advanced Patient-Oriented Outcomes (ATRN 7130)
      Health Information Technology (ATRN 7140)

      The certificate is completed and awarded at the end of the fall semester.

      Example 2:

      Apply for admission for the fall intake, and take 1 class per block. In this case, the student gets to choose which of the two courses to take first, although ATRN 7110 is recommended.

      This could result in the following certificate plan:

      Fall Block 1:
      Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (ATRN 7110)

      Fall Block 2:
      Advanced Patient-Oriented Outcomes (ATRN 7130)

      Spring Block 1:
      Evidence-Based Practice (ATRN 7120)

      Spring Block 2:
      Health Information Technology (ATRN 7140)

      The certificate is completed and awarded at the end of the spring semester

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