Master of Science in Human Movement Online

Master of Science in Human Movement Online

Online Degree for Kinesiology, Exercise Science and Exercise Physiology Expertise

A.T. Still University’s Master of Science in Human Movement is a post-professional degree designed for working health and fitness professionals. This online degree is focused on developing experts to be clinical leaders in human movement, exercise science, health and fitness.

In this exceptional online master’s program you will develop skills to help lead your community and advance your practice. You will gain comprehensive knowledge and proficiency in functional anatomy, exercise physiology and kinesiology, behavior change, functional assessment and exercise program design.

Offered through the Arizona School of Health Sciences, this graduate level online Human Movement degree focuses on evidence-based research allowing clinicians working with clients, patients and populations to immediately apply what they’ve learned. The program elevates sports medicine, exercise and fitness professionals by enhancing knowledge, skills, and abilities in the design and maintenance of exercise science programs, and serves as a valuable source of credibility to health professionals, athletic organizations, educators, club owners, coaches, and fitness department managers.

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As a post-professional exercise science program, this broad-scope health and fitness degree was developed to build on the foundation of your experience in exercise physiology, kinesiology, biomechanics or related fields. A bachelor’s degree is required, and prospective exercise science students must be a health, wellness, sport, or fitness professional with at least two years of experience, or be a training professional with an NCCA accreditation or a licensed healthcare professional.

Students pursuing this Human Movement degree will choose one of the four specialty tracks based on your unique interests and aptitudes: Sports Conditioning, Exercise and Sports Psychology, Geriatric Exercise Science, or Research Thesis.

Exercise & Sports Psychology

The Exercise and Sports Psychology track combines the science and practice of the psychology of exercise, mental health and performance to teach students the principles of creating programs that trigger behavior change and maximize long term adherence. Courses include Psychology; Physical Activity and Health; Exercise and Mental Health; Applied Sports Psychology; and Principles of Adherence and Motivation.

Geriatric Exercise Science

The Geriatric Exercise Science track provides learning opportunities for fitness professionals to focus on the physical and psychological principles of exercise and movement science among older adults. Courses include Physical Dimensions of Aging and Physical Activity; Psychosocial Dimensions of Aging and Physical Activity; Exercise Prescription for Older Adults; and Motivational Strategies for Physical Activity among Older Adults.

Sports Conditioning

The Sports Conditioning track combines current knowledge and practice in sports conditioning to enable students to develop advanced training programs for athletes. Courses include Measurement of Sports Fitness; Muscular Fitness Development; Speed, Agility, and Quickness; and the Science and Practice of Metabolic Conditioning.

Corrective Exercise & Orthopedic Rehabilitation

The Corrective Exercise & Orthopedic Rehabilitation track is designed to provide the allied health care and fitness professional with the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to design and implement exercise programs for individuals with musculoskeletal and movement dysfunction. Courses include, Human Movement Dysfunction, Functional Assessment for Development of Corrective and Post-Rehabilitation Exercise Programs, Post-Rehabilitation Exercise, and Corrective Exercise Programming.

The online Human Movement degree program contains 42-credit hours of study: 40-credit hours through online education, plus two credit hours at a week-long conference at the ATSU Human Movement Institute.

Consisting of a four-day residency in Mesa, AZ, location of ATSU’s Arizona campus, the Human Movement Institute is a unique and valuable opportunity to perform hands-on, cutting-edge work and learn the latest concepts and methodologies from industry experts. The Institute provides opportunity to obtain face-to-face practical mentoring while building relationships with peers and faculty to develop important contacts and attain the insights you need to excel in your field.

As a graduate of ATSU’s Master of Science in Human Movement degree program, you will gain industry-wide respect, and enjoy access to ATSU’s network of world-class faculty and alumni.

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  • National Strength and Conditioning Association Recognition +

    • The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) Education Recognition Program (ERP) recognizes regionally accredited academic institutions for their educational programs that have met, and continue to meet, educational guidelines recommended by the NSCA.

      The Graduate Studies Program recognizes colleges and universities that offer at least a Master’s degree related to strength and conditioning and/or sport performance. For successfully meeting established criteria, the NSCA officially recognizes A.T. Still University’s Graduate Program in Human Movement as a Graduate Studies Program.


  • Accreditation +

    • Higher Learning Commission Mark of Affiliation

      A.T. Still University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, a commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 230 S. LaSalle Street; Suite 7-500; Chicago, IL 60604, Phone: 800.621.7440.

      Degree-granting authority for ASHS has been given by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, 1400 West Washington Rd., Room 260, Phoenix, AZ 85007. Phone 602.542.5709.

  • Career Advancement+

    • The fitness industry in the United States is a million dollar industry that continues to grow exponentially. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, fitness workers held 261,100 jobs in 2008 and the employment of fitness workers is expected to surpass the averages for all occupations in 2010. This is a unique industry in which kinesiology professionals are able to make a direct difference and change peoples’ lives.
  • Student Insights +

    • “I enrolled in ATSU’s Human Movement program so I could help others move better, move more, and move pain free after injury or illness. As a medically retired firefighter, I know how devastating an injury can be, how stressful surgery is, and how the road to full recovery is often bumpy and complicated. ATSU’s program in Kinesiology has given me the tools and biopsychosocial perspective I need to effectively help others along their journey to optimal rehabilitation and peak performance.”
      ~ Joletta Belton, Contributing Writer at National Tactical Fitness Greater San Diego Area

Master of Science in Human Movement Degree Faculty

The human movement faculty you will learn from include renowned experts in the field, including researchers, authors, elite coaches and a former Olympian. Their research has been published and presented in leading sources around the world and their professional work is cutting-edge. Through its collaboration with leading organizations in exercise, health, and fitness, our online Human Movement degree program exposes exercise science students to leaders in the field, and innovative ideas for current and future solutions on addressing unmet community health needs.

  • Dean +

      • Randy D. Danielsen, PhD, PA-C, DFAAPA

        Dr. Danielsen is dean of the Arizona School of Health Sciences. Since graduating from the University of Utah Physician Assistant (PA) Program in 1974, Dr. Danielsen has distinguished himself as a clinician, PA educator, author, and editor. He received his BS in Health Science (cum laude) from the University of Utah in 1978, his Masters in PA Studies (MPAS) from the University of Nebraska with an emphasis on Internal Medicine in 1997, and his PhD from the Union Institute & University in 2003 with an emphasis on Medical Education. He completed sixteen years with A.T. Still University as academic coordinator (1995-1997), chair of physician assistant studies (1997-2004), and as dean of the Arizona School of Health Sciences (2004-2010) and recently returned as Dean of ASHS. He was honored in 2010 by A.T. Still University with Emeritus Professor status. He has served on the board of directors of the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) and as a board member and chairman for National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants.

        Earlier in his career, Dr. Danielsen served as president of the Utah Academy of Physician Assistants, the Arizona State Association of PAs, and as chair of the Arizona Regulatory Board for PAs. Retired after 28 years of service in the US Air Force and Army National Guard with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, Dr. Danielsen also is a former president of the Veterans Caucus of the AAPA and was honored with the Caucus’ Civilian PA of the Year Award in 2003.

        Dr. Danielsen was named Outstanding PA of the Year by the AAPA in 1993 and by the Arizona State Association of Physician Assistants in 2011. He currently serves as PA editor-in-chief for Clinician Review. Dr. Danielsen has published over sixteen peer-reviewed articles, eighteen journal editorials, two book chapters, and most recently his first book, entitled The Preceptor’s Handbook for Supervising Physician Assistants, published by Jones & Bartlett Learning. Recently he was selected as a Senior Consultant with the Academy for Academic Leadership.

  • Vice Dean +

      • Annlee Burch, PT, MPH, EdD

        Dr. Burch is Vice Dean of the Arizona School of Health Sciences. Her primary responsibility is to serve as Chief Operating Officer of the School under the direction of the Dean. In addition, she leads several University or School wide initiatives including the Diversity Initiative Task Force and the ASHS Adelante Project. In her role, Dr. Burch represents the School in the Dean’s absence.

        Dr. Burch received her Doctor of Education (EdD) from Columbia University, Teachers College in 2005. She received her Masters of Public Health (MPH) from Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health in 2002 and her Masters of Physical Therapy (MS) from Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1989. She was a postdoctoral fellow with the Research Group on Health Disparities at Teachers College, Columbia University.

        Dr. Burch received her BA in Psychology from the University of Rochester. Prior to her appointment as Vice Dean, Dr. Burch served as the Chair of Physical Therapy from 2008-January 2012. Prior to coming to ATSU, Dr. Burch was the Director of Physical Therapy at the University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus in San Juan, Puerto Rico. She has held administrative and/or faculty positions at the International Center for the Disabled in NY, NY, Mercy College in NY, and Long Island University in Brooklyn, NY.

  • Chair +

      • Eric Sauers, PhD, ATC, FNATA
        Interdisciplinary Science


        Dr. Eric Sauers is a tenured Full Professor and Chair of the Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences at the A. T. Still University (ATSU) Arizona School of Health Sciences (ASHS). Dr. Sauers received his bachelor’s degree in exercise science from Seattle Pacific University and his master of science degree in sports health care from ATSU. He completed his doctor of philosophy degree in sports medicine at Oregon State University (OSU).

        As the founding chair of the department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences, Dr. Sauers planned and implemented the online Human Movement program and the online Doctor of Health Sciences program, which he currently oversees, in addition to overseeing the Master of Science degree program in Athletic Training, the Human Anatomy Division, and the Biostatistics and Clinical Research Division. Dr. Sauers served as the director of the Athletic Training Program from 2000 to 2009. His primary research interests are related to the assessment of clinical outcomes and health-related quality of life in athletes following musculoskeletal injury, the examination and rehabilitation of the athletic shoulder and post-professional athletic training education.

        Dr. Sauers has published numerous peer-reviewed scientific articles and given numerous state, regional, and national presentations related to his research. He is the president of the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists and vice president of the Commission on the Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Dr. Sauers is the Associate Editor for Clinical Outcomes for the Journal of Sport Rehabilitation and an Editorial Board member for the Journal of Athletic Training and the Athletic Training Education Journal. Currently, he serves as the Chair of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) Post-Professional Education Committee and as a member of the NATA Education Council Executive Committee. Dr. Sauers received the President’s Award from the Arizona Athletic Trainers’ Association, the Distinguished Educator Award from the Rocky Mountain Athletic Trainers’ Association, and was recognized for his dedication to the athletic training profession with the distinction as a Fellow of the NATA.

  • Director +

      • Tracie Rogers, PhD
        Program Director, Associate Professor

        Dr. Rogers has a combination of academic and applied experience in the exercise field. She received her bachelor of science degree in psychology from the University of Arizona and went on to earn her PhD in Kinesiology, with a focus on sport and exercise psychology, from Arizona State University, in 2003. Dr. Rogers is a consultant and faculty member for the American Council on Exercise where she creates courses and serves as a subject matter expert for curriculum development and continued education.

        Dr. Rogers speaks nationally to fitness professionals and writes extensively on the role of the personal trainer in triggering lasting behavior change and on the creation of exercise environments that promote long term adherence. In addition, Dr. Rogers works with athletes and teams, helping them realize the control they have over their athletic experience and performance. Dr. Rogers is passionate about getting people moving and helping them incorporate physical activity into their daily lives.

  • Faculty +

      • Matthew Rhea, PhD
        Associate Professor
        Read Bio
      • Jack Daniels, PhD
        Associate Professor
        Read Bio
      • Kellie Bliven, PhD
        Associate Professor
        Read Bio
      • Sarah Johnston, PhD
        Assistant Professor
        Read Bio

Master of Science in Human Movement Degree Admissions

Qualified candidates must hold a bachelor’s degree, and be a health, wellness, sport, or fitness professional with at least two years of professional experience, or be a training professional with an NCCA accredited certification (ACE, ACSM, IFPA, NASM, NCSF, NESTA, NFPT, NSCA, Cooper Institute) or licensed healthcare professional (ATC, PT, DC, OT, PA, RN, RD, etc.).

  • Requirements +

    • The Human Movement degree program will admit human movement, health and fitness, and healthcare professionals with diverse graduate education, work history, and life experiences who have demonstrated capacity to pursue a rigorous course of graduate study and increasingly responsible positions in the health and fitness industries.

      Prospective human movement degree students are selected by considering the overall qualities of the applicant through application content, academic record, prior experience, letters of evaluation, and personal motivation. In special circumstances, a personal interview may be required.

      Candidates accepted for admission to the Human Movement program will have earned a bachelor’s or higher degree prior to enrollment from a regionally accredited institution.
      Candidates must be a health, wellness, sport, or fitness professional with at least two years of professional experience or be a licensed or certified fitness / personal training professional with an NCCA accredited certification (ACE, ACSM, IFPA, NASM, NCSF, NESTA, NFPT, NSCA, Cooper Institute) , or healthcare professional (ATC, PT, DC, OT, PA, RN, RD, etc.).
      Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0 (4.0 scale) at the qualifying degree institution. Candidates with a GPA below 3.0 may still apply by completing an additional essay during the application process that explains what factors impacted the student’s low GPA and how and why they will be successful in the program.
      Candidates are expected to be computer literate and experienced in word processing. All curricula require extensive computer usage. Accepted applicants are required to have a personal computer prior to matriculation and have access to a high-speed Internet connection.

      Candidates must submit a completed application form.
      Candidates must identify references from: 1) a present or former faculty member, academic advisor, or employer, and 2) a human movement/healthcare professional. Letters from an educational consulting service will not qualify.
      Applicants must provide official transcripts from all educational institutions attended where a degree was conferred.

      Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) for applicants when English is not their first language. The Computer Based Test (CBT), Internet Based Test (iBT), or the Paper Based Test (PBT) are accepted.

      Foreign graduates are also required to submit a transcripts evaluation which states the student has a U.S. bachelor’s degree equivalent or higher. The evaluation MUST come from an approved agency listed with NACES (www.naces.org).

      For additional information contact an Enrollment Counselor at 877.469.2878 or onlineinquiry@atsu.edu.

  • Application +

    • An application package for this program is available in PDF format for download and print out. The name of the Master of Science in Human Movement is transitioning to the Master of Science in Kinesiology. The application form reflects the program’s updated name.

      The application may be faxed or mailed to:
      Online Admissions
      A.T. Still University
      5845 E. Still Circle, Suite 213
      Mesa, AZ 85206-3618
      Fax: 480.219.6122

      For additional information contact an Enrollment Counselor:
      877.469.2878 or onlineinquiry@atsu.edu

  • Financial Aid+

    • THE 9 STEPS REQUIRED FOR A STUDENT TO RECEIVE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE ARE AS FOLLOWS:

      The student completes the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FASFA) or a Renewal FAFSA by going to www.fafsa.ed.gov and following the instructions on the website. ATSU’s school code is G02477.

      The Central Processing System (CPS) performs matches and edits, calculates a student contribution, and sends the data back to the processor.

      ATSU receives the information electronically (ISIR) within three to five business days.

      The student looks over the Student Aid Report (SAR) and, if accurate, keeps it for his/her records. If any corrections are needed, the student contacts the Financial Assistance Office.

      Student Financial Services performs verification and then sends an electronic award letter to the student’s ATSU email address, along with instructions for completing the loan applications and other required forms.

      The student accepts, refuses, or modifies the award letter and submits all required forms to the Financial Assistance Office.

      Student Financial Services looks over the required forms and transmits the loan data to Sallie Mae

      The lender wires the funds by Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) to the school or sends the institution a loan check.

      If by EFT, all funds will be applied to the student’s account. The refund will be directly deposited to the student’s bank account if so desired by the student and proper documentation is on file.

      Eligibility for Financial Assistance

      Eligibility or unmet financial need is determined by subtracting a student’s expected contribution from the student budget. The student’s expected contribution is listed on the Student Aid Report (SAR) and is based on the student’s financial strength. Students may choose to receive financial assistance up to their unmet financial need. For example, if a student’s budget is $9,000 and the expected contribution is $5,000, the student’s unmet financial need is $4,000. The student may receive financial aid through scholarships, loans, etc., to arrive at this figure. (Note: Students may use the Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan or any private loan to replace their expected contribution.) Every effort will be made to meet the student’s need, but in some instances, the student may have to rely on other outside resources. It is of critical importance to be creditworthy, as most private loans require a credit check.

      Satisfactory Academic Progress for Federal Financial Aid

      According to the United States Department of Education regulations, (34CRF 668/16 and 668.34 and October 29, 2010 Final Federal Register), all students receiving federal financial assistance must meet and maintain satisfactory academic progress. Student Financial Services will review the academic progress of financial aid recipients after each payment period. Satisfactory academic progress (SAP) is measured in terms of qualitative and quantitative standards.

      Qualitative Measure

      The qualitative measure of a student’s progress is measured by cumulative grade point average. The minimum cumulative GPA students must maintain for financial aid is as follows:

      Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average at A.T. Still University
      2.00 for all programs on 4.0 scale
      70% for all programs on 100% scale

      Quantitative Measure

      Maximum Time Frame

      Financial aid recipients must complete an educational program within a time frame no longer than 150% of the published length of the educational program. All attempted withdrawn, failed, repeated, and/or transferred credits that apply to a student’s program count toward this maximum time limit. For example, a student pursuing a doctorate degree requiring 120 credit hours may attempt up to 180 credit hours before financial aid eligibility is suspended (120 x 150% = 180). A student pursuing a doctorate degree requiring 5100 contact hours may attempt up to 7650 contact hours before financial aid eligibility is suspended (5100 x 150% = 7650).

      Pace of Progression

      Pace of progression is required to ensure students complete within a maximum time frame and that the pace is measured at each standard review time. Financial aid recipients must maintain a 67% minimum completion rate for attempted credit hours or contact hours. For example, a student pursuing a doctorate degree requiring 120 credit hours may attempt up to 180 hours before financial aid eligibility is suspended (120 divided by 180 = 67%). A student pursuing a doctorate degree requiring 5100 contact hours may attempt up to 7650 contact hours before financial aid eligibility is suspended (5100 divided by 7650 = 67%).

      Dropped, failed, and remedial courses for which no credit is received do not count towards credit hours earned. Credit hours for a course are earned by completing and passing the class.

      Financial Aid Warning

      Failure to meet the minimum academic progress requirements will result in a student being issued a financial aid warning. Students issued a financial aid warning will have one payment period to correct a progress problem due to qualitative or quantitative standards. Students will be notified of their status in writing via ATSU email. Students issued a financial aid warning will have an opportunity to file an appeal to request financial aid probation prior to the upcoming standard review time, which is at the end of each payment period.

      Financial Aid Probation

      If a student appeals their financial aid probation status and the appeal is approved, that student is put on financial aid probation for one payment period. Students may receive federal financial aid while on financial aid probation if he/she meets the terms of his/her appeal decision. If a student fails to meet SAP standards during the term of financial aid probation, he/she may request an additional appeal.

      Financial Aid Suspension

      Students who fail to meet the requirements of the financial aid warning or do not appeal their financial aid probation status are placed on financial aid suspension and are not eligible for federal financial aid. These students will receive written notification to their ATSU email account of their failure to comply and that future federal aid will be canceled.

      Appeal Procedure

      Students who have been issued a financial aid warning may submit a written appeal for reinstatement of eligibility prior to the start of the next payment period. Occasionally, extenuating circumstances contribute to their inability to meet the requirements for satisfactory progress. Extenuating circumstances include, but are not limited to, the following:

      • Death of an immediate family member
      • Severe injury or illness of the student or an immediate family member
      • Emergency situations such as fire or flood
      • Legal separation from spouse or divorce
      • Military reassignment or required job transfers or shift changes

      Students whose appeal is denied must establish eligibility by completing courses without federal aid in one or more payment periods at ATSU until the cumulative GPA and/or completion rate meet the required standard before any additional federal aid will be disbursed.

      Students who have extenuating circumstances may appeal using the following procedure:

      • Submit a completed Appeal form. Student will be notified if additional supporting documentation is required.
      • Appeal packet is presented to the SAP Committee for consideration.
      • Student is notified via email of the SAP Committee’s decision and recommendations.
      Reinstatement

      Federal financial aid may be reinstated when one of the following conditions has been met:

      The student completes courses without federal aid in one or more payment periods at ATSU until the cumulative GPA and/or completion rate meet the required standard.
      - OR -


      The student files an appeal and the SAP Committee approves the appeal. It is the student’s responsibility to notify Student Financial Services when reinstatement conditions have been met.

      Enrollment Status Policy

      Full-time enrollment definition

      Students enrolled in the Doctor of Dental Medicine and Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine are always defined as full-time.

      Full-time enrollment requires enrollment in a minimum of nine (9) quarter credit hours, or six (6) semester hours.

      Half-time enrollment definition

      Half-time enrollment is defined by enrollment in a minimum of five (5) quarter credit hours or three (3) semester hours.

      Enrollment Status Definitions 1 Quarter Credit = .67 semester credit
      Program Minimum # of Credit Hours Minimum # of Credit Hours
      Full-Time Half-Time
      Osteopathic Medicine and Dental Enrollment is always full-time
      All other programs 9/quarter, 6/semester 5/quarter, 3/semester

      Student Budget Determination

      The student expense budget is determined each year by the Director of Student Financial Services. Every effort is made to ensure that allowances in each category are realistic and fair. Although the Director of Student Financial Services determines the average student budget, students having credit history difficulties may not be able to borrow the full budgeted amount due to the private loans being based on creditworthiness.

      Verification

      Verification is the process by which Student Financial Services checks the accuracy of the information submitted by the student when applying for federal financial aid. It is intended to reduce errors in the financial information that students submit so eligible applicants can receive the correct amount of financial assistance.

      ATSU will verify all applicants who are selected for verification from the federally approved edits. If selected, students will need to submit a signed copy of their federal income tax return from the prior calendar year along with a verification worksheet. ATSU will compare the tax return and the verification worksheet to the Institutional Student Information Record (ISIR) to verify required items. Financial aid will not be awarded until the verification is complete.

      Special Conditions

      Professional judgment allows the Director and Assistant Director the flexibility to handle individual students with extenuating circumstances on a case-by-case basis. This authority is clearly stated in the regulations and is used as needed. The adjustments may be made in the cost of attendance, expected family contribution, or satisfactory academic progress.

      Although every effort is made to meet a student’s financial need, financial assistance is not an entitlement and, in some instances, not all of a student’s need will be met.

      Financial Planning

      Setting Goals

      Financing your education is an investment in your future. As a major investment, it should be entered into with conscientious planning. Setting goals and establishing a game plan are essential in order to minimize your debt.

      A simple financial plan begins with the establishment of a long-term goal. As you plan your strategies to reach this end, keep in mind that your short- and mid-term goals should be consistent with and built upon this long-term goal. To help keep you on track, it is important to develop a budget.

      A budget lists all sources of income, as well as all estimated expenditures. To make a budget work for you, keep the following points in mind:

      Have a written plan
      Set realistic goals
      Establish priorities
      Keep expenditures below income
      Stick to your game plan

      It is important for you to determine your needs so that you will borrow only the amount necessary, rather than the amount for which you are eligible. In the end, you may pay back 2-3 times the amount you borrowed. Therefore, the less debt you accrue in school, the more financially secure you will be later.

      Tuition

      For online programs, tuition is due 14 calendar days prior to the first day of class. For programs with payment per credit or course, the tuition covers the payment for the coming quarter. For programs that have payment per program, payment in full is due prior to the start of the program or per their admissions agreement on a quarterly payment schedule. The Controller’s Office will receive tuition payments and make refunds as necessary. Delinquent tuition penalties accrue at 1 1/2% per month, which is 18% per year.

      Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) Policy

      The Department of Education is encouraging and, at times, requiring educational institutions to become paperless. Therefore, funds received through federal and private loans will normally be transferred electronically to a student’s account at ATSU. Students will receive a receipt itemizing the type of loan and amount credited to their account at the institution. Funds electronically transferred above what is owed for tuition and fees will promptly be refunded to the student by check or deposited directly to the student’s bank account. (Students that have lenders that do not wire money to ATSU will receive their financial aid through a co-payable check.) Generally, funds are available when tuition is due.

      Direct Deposit

      Many banks in states outside of Missouri make students wait 10 business days to tap their loan funds when deposited by check. Therefore, we require all students to use direct deposit where ATSU wires money to the student’s bank account. This way, the money is available on the day it is wired to the bank.

The Family and Culture


 

  • Blackboard Demo Course +

    • ATSU has set up a demo course of our Blackboard
      Learning Management System for interested students.

      Please go to our guest demo site, and login with:

      Username: HMdemo
      Password: atsudemo


      Connect Now

Master of Science in Human Movement Curriculum Overview

This program in exercise science and kinesiology offers an experience-based curriculum that prepares students to be leaders in advanced human movement, with expertise in functional anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, behavior change, functional assessment, fitness and exercise program design.

The online Human Movement degree program consists of 42-credit hours of study: 24 credit hours comprise core course work, plus six credit hours of elective course work and 12 credit hours of specialty-track/certificate or research thesis course work.

  • Curriculum Plan Overview+

    • Curriculum Overview Quarter Hours
      Human Movement Core 24
      Electives 6
      Specialized Track 12
      Total 42
      Human Movement Core (24 core plus 6 elective credits) Quarter Hours
      Core Required Courses (24 credits total)
      500 Motor Control 3
      501 Exercise Science 3
      502 Functional Anatomy 3
      503 Functional Biomechanics 3
      504 Human Movement Dysfunction 3
      506 Professional Practice & Responsibility 1
      509 Exercise and Sport Related Nutrition 3
      604 Human Movement Institute 2
      706 Evidence-Based Practice and Research Methods 3
      Total 24
      Core Required Electives (6 credits total) Quarter Hours
      511 Advanced Fitness Nutrition 3
      512 Advanced Exercise Prescription 3
      513 Post Rehabilitation Exercise 3
      605 Current Topics in Human Movement Science 3
      Total 30
      Sports Conditioning Track/Certificate (12 credits total) Quarter Hours
      606 Measurement of Sports Fitness 3
      607 Muscular Fitness Development 3
      608 Speed, Agility, and Quickness 3
      609 The Science and Practice of Metabolic Conditioning 3
      Total 42
      Exercise & Sports Psychology Track/Certificate (12 credits total) Quarter Hours
      610 Psychology, Physical Activity, and Health 3
      611 Exercise and Mental Health 3
      612 Applied Sports Psychology 3
      613 Principles of Adherence and Motivation 3
      Total 42
      Geriatric Exercise Science Track/Certificate (12 credits total) Quarter Hours
      700 Physical Dimensions of Aging and Physical Activity 3
      701 Psychosocial Dimensions of Aging and Physical Act 3
      702 Exercise Prescription for Older Adults 3
      703 Motivational Strategies for PA among Older Adults 3
      Total 42
      Corrective Exercise & Orthopedic Rehabilitation Track (12 credits total) Quarter Hours
      710 Thesis I: Literature Review 3
      711 Thesis II: Proposal and IRB Application 3
      712 Thesis III: Data Collection and Analysis 3
      713 Thesis IV: Synthesis and Dissemination 3
      Total 42

Human Movement Core

  • HM 500 Motor Control+

    • The objective of this course is to examine current theory and research in the neurophysiological mechanisms and control of human movement. Central, peripheral, and combined control of skilled movement and the postural mechanisms underlying voluntary movement will be emphasized.

  • HM 501 Exercise Science+

    • The objective of this course is to explore the physiological principles of exercise. Specific topics include the functions of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, neuromuscular and neuroendocrine systems, energy expenditure and bioenergetics, and body composition.

  • HM 502 Functional Anatomy+

    • The objective of this course is to integrate the foundational knowledge of gross anatomy with structure and function of the neuromusculoskeletal system during human movement. Emphasis will be placed upon the muscles involved in human movement, describing their proximal and distal attachments, blood supply, innervation, and function in open and closed kinetic chain.

  • HM 503 Functional Biomechanics+

    • The objective of this course is to study the biomechanical properties of joint structures and connective tissues, including histology and morphology, with particular emphasis on sport and exercise movements. Biomechanics of musculotendinous structures, joint capsules, ligaments, peripheral nerves, bones, and articular cartilage will be presented.

  • HM 504 Human Movement Dysfunction+

    • The objective of this course is to examine the relationship between the control of skilled movement and movement impairment and dysfunction. Common movement impairment and dysfunction patterns in skilled movement will be emphasized.

  • HM 506 Professional Practice & Responsibility+

    • The objective of this course is to ensure that kinesiology professionals maintain competence in educational and regulatory issues. Topics include compliance with regulatory standards, professional practice standards and ethics, education of the public, preservation of the safety and welfare of the public, and maintenance of competence through continuing education.

    • The objective of this course is to learn how to facilitate and educate clients about general nutrition recommendations to maintain health, alter body composition, and improve performance. The course will focus on providing sound advice to clients regarding the nutritional requirements for general health, lean mass gain, body fat loss, anaerobic athletic performance, and aerobic athletic performance.

    • The objective of this course is to learn advanced concepts of general fitness and sport specific nutrition. Detailed discussions of bioenergetics, advanced nutritional recommendations, supplements and ergogenic aids, weight management, and current fads and trends in the industry will be included.

  • HM 512 Advanced Exercise Prescription+

    • This course will provide an overview of comprehensive goal based exercise program design for different populations. The objective of this course is to gain knowledge and skills for building complete exercise programs that are unique to client needs, abilities, and goals, including performing and incorporating subjective and objective assessment results and appropriate medical history information. The integration of exercise principles and behavioral techniques that motivate the participant to be compliant will be emphasized. This course will focus on integrated training and injury prevention techniques through the interdependent relationship of flexibility, core, balance, power, speed, and strength.

  • HM 513 Post Rehabilitation Exercise+

    • The objective of this course is to learn how to design and apply training programs for individuals who are transitioning from a rehabilitative setting to a more traditional exercise environment. This course will provide an overview to a systematic approach for post-rehabilitation exercise. This course will focus on reducing the risk of injury while training and performing activities of daily living along with identifying and applying strategies for program application, communicating goals and rationale, and correlating assessment outcomes with individualized programs.

  • HM 604 Human Movement Summer Institute+

    • The Institute includes one week of intensive training held on the ASHS campus in Mesa, Arizona. Students will participate in lecture/lab situations covering program-related information. Guest speakers representing leaders in the field of kinesiology, exercise science and human movement will be recruited to present their work to students as well as to interact with attendees. This is a one-time requirement for completion of the degree; however, students are welcome to enroll each year.

  • HM 605 Special Topics in Human Movement Science+

    • This is a variable credit course (1-3) designed to provide students an opportunity to study and discuss current topics in the areas of health, fitness, and performance enhancement. Topics are chosen based on current trends or issues in the field.

  • HM 706 Evidence-Based Practice and Research Methods+

    • The objective of this course is to introduce the kinesiology professional to the concepts of evidence-based practice. Students will learn how to access high quality literature, integrate best research with clinical expertise and client values for optimum care, and will be encouraged to participate in learning and research activities to the extent feasible. The course will provide the kinesiology professional with graduate level knowledge and skills related to appropriate research methods and study design, conducting a literature review, creating a research proposal, the role of institutional review for human subjects’ protection, and evaluation of the research literature. Emphasis will be placed upon critical appraisal and application of the human movement literature.

Core Electives

  • HM 511 Advanced Fitness Nutrition+

    • The objective of this course is to learn advanced concepts of general fitness and sport specific nutrition. Detailed discussions of bioenergetics, advanced nutritional recommendations, supplements and ergogenic aids, weight management, and current fads and trends in the industry will be included.

  • HM 512 Advanced Exercise Prescription+

    • This course will provide an overview of comprehensive goal based exercise program design for different populations. The objective of this course is to gain knowledge and skills for building complete exercise programs that are unique to client needs, abilities, and goals, including performing and incorporating subjective and objective assessment results and appropriate medical history information. The integration of exercise principles and behavioral techniques that motivate the participant to be compliant will be emphasized. This course will focus on integrated training and injury prevention techniques through the interdependent relationship of flexibility, core, balance, power, speed, and strength.

  • HM 513 Post Rehabilitation Exercise+

    • The objective of this course is to learn how to design and apply training programs for individuals who are transitioning from a rehabilitative setting to a more traditional exercise environment. This course will provide an overview to a systematic approach for post-rehabilitation exercise. This course will focus on reducing the risk of injury while training and performing activities of daily living along with identifying and applying strategies for program application, communicating goals and rationale, and correlating assessment outcomes with individualized programs.

  • HM 605 Special Topics in Human Movement Science+

    • This is a variable credit course (1-3) designed to provide students an opportunity to study and discuss current topics in the areas of health, fitness, and performance enhancement. Topics are chosen based on current trends or issues in the field.

Sports Conditioning Track (certificate)

  • HM 606 Measurement of Sports Fitness+

    • This course will cover sport-specific fitness and performance testing. The objective of the course is to enable the student to develop a sport-specific, age-appropriate testing battery, reliably conduct the testing, and correctly interpret the results.

  • HM 607 Muscular Fitness Development+

    • This course is designed to enhance the knowledge of muscular performance capabilities, differentiate between muscular functions as it relates to sport performance, and develop training programs to enhance specific performance profiles.

  • HM 608 Speed, Agility, and Quickness+

    • This course will cover the physiological basis for speed, agility, and quickness as well as practical methods for developing such qualities among athletes of various developmental abilities. Focus will be put on sport-specific training modes.

Exercise and Sports Psychology Track (certificate)

  • HM 610 Psychology, Physical Activity, and Health+

    • This course will cover principles of health psychology and behavior change related to physical activity adoption, participation, and adherence. The objective of the course is for health professionals to develop the knowledge and skills to understand the importance of implementing behavior change strategies as part of all physical activity programs and to be able to develop and implement such strategies. Techniques for incorporating behavior change strategies into fitness programming and health promotion will be taught.

  • HM 611 Exercise and Mental Health+

    • This course will cover the relationships between mental health conditions and exercise, including depression, anxiety, self-esteem, stress, and mood. The primary objective is for health and fitness professionals to acquire an understanding of theories, methods, and experimental literature concerning psychological factors related to exercise participation and well-being. Additionally, the practical importance and application of the current research literature will be discussed along with methods to educate the general population on mental health and exercise relationships

  • HM 612 Applied Sport Psychology+

    • This course will examine psychological theories and techniques applied to a sport to enhance the performance and personal growth of athletes and coaches. The key principles of performance enhancement that are directly applicable to all performance endeavors, including sport, business, and persona will be covered. The objective of the course is to understand theory and to teach application of the fundamental psychological skills that are related to peak performance.

  • HM 613 Principles of Adherence and Motivation+

    • This course will examine the theories of motivation and exercise behavior in relation to the problem of exercise participation and adherence. The primary objective of this course is for the student to develop an understanding of the role of motivation and the determinants and consequences of motivation in the exercise context. This course will provide an in-depth understanding of the role of the fitness professional in building motivation and of how motivation can be used as part of an exercise program to help maximize program success and long-term adherence.

Geriatric Exercise Science Track (certificate)

  • HM 701 - Psychosocial Dimensions of Aging and the Impact of Physical Activity+

    • A study of the psychological and social aspects of aging including myths of aging, related barriers to physical activity participation, changes in social dynamics, and predictors of successful aging. The impact of regular physical activity on the psychosocial health and overall well-being of older adults will also be examined.

  • HM 702 - Exercise Prescription for Older Adults+

    • A study of fitness instruction and programming for older adults, including importance of physical activity for older adults, pre-program assessment, prescription for various modes of exercise, and considerations for older adults with specific chronic disease conditions.

Corrective Exercise & Orthopedic Rehabilitation Track

  • Corrective Exercise & Orthopedic Rehabilitation Track+

    • The Corrective Exercise & Orthopedic Rehabilitation track is designed to provide the allied health care and fitness professional with the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to design and implement exercise programs for individuals with musculoskeletal and movement dysfunction. Courses include, Human Movement Dysfunction, Functional Assessment for Development of Corrective and Post-Rehabilitation Exercise Programs, Post-Rehabilitation Exercise, and Corrective Exercise Programming.

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INNOVATING WHOLE PERSON HEALTHCARE

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