Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine
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KCOM

Preceptors

Your Role as a Preceptor Benefits for Preceptor

Professional Development Preceptor CE Credit

Academic & Clinical Educational Affairs contact & Regional Site locations

 

Education Opportunities

Teaching FAQs

  1. My student is here, now what do I do?
  2. How am I supposed to interact with my student?
  3. My student just encountered a very "challenging" patient and feels pretty worked over. How can I turn this into a learning encounter?
  4. Things go pretty well with students who come on my service. I get pretty good marks on their evaluations. But how can I tell if I'm really offering a high quality preceptorship?
  5. My practice has really changed due to the impact of managed care. I want to make sure these students are better prepared for that reality than I was. Got any ideas how I can teach them anything on managed care?
  6. I keep hearing about Evidence-based Medicine. KCOM doesn't expect me to teach that too, do they?

Answers

  1. My student is here, now what do I do?

    A good first activity to do with a newly reporting student is Goal Ranking and Matching. Using this worksheet prompts the discussion points you need to have with the student in order to assure a productive rotation experience. Preceptors are sometimes surprised at the different goals brought to the encounter by students. It is best for the preceptor and the student to align their expectations for the rotation from the beginning. Let us know if this worksheet helps to structure that first meeting with your student.

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  2. How am I supposed to interact with my student?

    Your student is assigned to rotations in order to learn. This means that the most productive interaction you can have with your student will be based upon personally giving coaching-style feedback. When done well and often this is the strongest instructional method you can use. Entire CME courses are available to enhance your skill in giving feedback and evaluation, but here are the "bare bones."

    Feedback that leads to learning is:

    • As specific as possible
    • Positive when deserved
    • Not demeaning when critical
    • Understandable
    • About things that can be changed
    • Well timed

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  3. My student just encountered a very "challenging" patient and feels pretty worked over. How can I turn this into a learning encounter?

    Research indicates that learning doesn't take place unless time for reflection is allowed. The ability to reflect upon actions is also a hallmark of being a professional, and one of the main reasons professionals have the right to police themselves. Help your student channel the emotions of that negative patient encounter into powerful learning by providing a pause for reflection on action. One way to structure that pause is to use a tool called "Student Reflection on a Difficult Patient."

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  4. Things go pretty well with students who come on my service. I get pretty good marks on their evaluations. But how can I tell if I'm really offering a high quality preceptorship?

    Since the first studies in 1964, lists of questions, e.g., "Clinical Experience Quality Indicators," have been used to assess the quality of undergraduate medical student experiences. Let us know how you stack up, and how KCOM can provide resources to help you by contacting the Regional Assistant Dean.

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  5. My practice has really changed due to the impact of managed care. I want to make sure these students are better prepared for that reality than I was. Got any ideas how I can teach them anything on managed care?

    There is nothing better than a case study for relevance in learning. Let the student study your practice, the nearest case study at hand! You can structure the inquiry by using these tools:

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  6. I keep hearing about Evidence-based Medicine. KCOM doesn't expect me to teach that too, do they?

    We don't expect you to deliver finely-tuned lectures on statistical significance. But we do expect you to model for your student how you keep current with medical information, and use it to improve the care of your patients. This is the way no one but preceptors can teach them! For help turning this essential modeling into the teaching of evidence-based medicine competencies, try the following tools:

    Student Task
    Learning Tool
    I want to assign a medical literature search. Try using the EBM Learning Prescription
    I want to help the student formulate a question for the literature search. Help him/her to use the PICO Chart to develop a question that will yield a manageable amount of well-targeted information.
    I want the student to critically appraise the literature we find. To guide your student in evaluating the references, ask him/her to complete the Critical Appraisal Worksheet found at the University of Alberta Medical School website. There is a complete menu of worksheets available depending upon the parameters of the review (e.g., cost, prevention, diagnostic tests, therapy, etc).

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